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Best Speech and Language Apps

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May 1, 2013 By: Vicki Windman

Apr 29

Written by:
4/29/2013 9:45 PM  RssIcon

Many novices do not realize the implications of a speech delay on a child's development. The iPad has opened many doors for children because of its multidisciplinary approach and its evidence-based practice. There are apps for almost every speech classification.  Here is a list of different apps for a variety of speech disabilities.

Non-Verbal- child does not have the ability to speak. Best apps are AAC apps that can be customized to meet the needs of the child. Easy to use and the possibility of data tracking makes an ideal app. Depending on your budget here are three different choices to help a student who is non-verbal.

Avaz for Autism $99.99- Just updated- easy to use- has a picture or text option making it good for all ages. Has the ability to collect data for a therapy session.

Voice4u- $49.99- This is less expensive but with fewer bells and whistles. It is easy to navigate and allows you to create visual schedules and social stories.

URtalker Pro- $9.99- A great price for 200 vocabulary of PEC (Picture Exchange Communication) vocabulary words. This app is very easy to use with the ability to add more words.

Apraxia- a speech disorder in which a person has trouble saying what he or she wants to say correctly and consistently.

Speech Flipbook $4.99 – This app not only helps child with apraxia but also works with articulation, phonological awareness, reading and more. Set up like a traditional flip book where you choose what the student needs to work on. Easy to set up and allows tremendous flexibility when choosing between sounds and words.

Speech Therapy apraxia words- $4.99 This app can also be used for articulation practice. It was developed by the National Association for Child Development. The app is set up to give the student and teacher/therapist different patterns of articulation within words while moving through a progression of levels the challenge motor planning for speech.

Expressive Language and Receptive Language- Expressive Language is a communication disorder in which there are difficulties with verbal and written language. Receptive Language affects the ability to understand the spoken word and sometimes written language.

Is that Silly? $9.99 Students are presented with over 120 picture cards.


Vicki Windman is a special education teacher at Clarkstown High School South.

 

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