Report: Principles of student-centered learning - Tech Learning

Report: Principles of student-centered learning

 The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA today released Innovate to Educate: System [Re]Design for Personalized Learning,
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The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), in collaboration with ASCD and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), today released Innovate to Educate: System [Re]Design for Personalized Learning, a report based upon the insights and recommendations of 150 education leaders convened at an August 4-6, 2010 Symposium in Boston, Mass.

The report provides a roadmap to accelerate the redesign of the current, mass-production education model to a student-centered, customized learning model that will better engage, motivate, and prepare our students to be career and college ready.

The Symposium brought together local and state practitioners, national thought leaders, and senior technology executives, who jointly identified the following key points of personalized learning:

Essential Elements

1. Flexible, Anytime, Everywhere Learning
2. Redefine Teacher Role and Expand "Teacher"
3. Project-Based, Authentic Learning
4. Student-Driven Learning Path
5. Mastery/Competency-Based Progression/Pace

Policy Enablers

1. Redefine Use of Time (Carnegie Unit/Calendar)
2. Performance-Based, Time-Flexible Assessment
3. Equity in Access to Technology Infrastructure
4. Funding Models that Incentivize Completion
5. P-20 Continuum & Non-Age/Grade Band System

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