Andover Public Schools Looking at Data Differently with Geovisual Technology - Tech Learning

Andover Public Schools Looking at Data Differently with Geovisual Technology

Andover Public Schools, the second-fastest growing district in the state of Kansas, recently implemented GuideK12 geovisual analytic software to support data-driven decisions.
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Andover Public Schools, the second-fastest growing district in the state of Kansas, recently implemented GuideK12 geovisual analytic software to support data-driven decisions.

With more than 5,300 students today, Andover saw potential in using GuideK12 to monitor attendance boundaries. As the district continues to grow, attendance areas will evolve to meet the needs of families and manage facility capacity. GuideK12 allows administrators to create scenarios on an interactive map and understand the impact of each proposal.

“Choosing GuideK12 was easy for us, and it will be an integral part of our continuous improvement tool set. There is so much this web-based software can do; we haven’t even begun to tap its full potential,” said Rob Dickson, Andover’s director of technology. “We are excited to look at data differently with visual analytics and see patterns, trends and test scores on an interactive map. It will allow us to make more effective, efficient decisions and serve the community better.”

Because Kansas has a significant number of tornados each year, the district also appreciated GuideK12’s ability to manage disaster recovery and emergency preparedness. The software allows the district to layer storm data over the attendance boundary maps, assess which buildings and families were affected and quickly begin communicating with accurate information.

Dickson will be hosting a session called “Look at your Data Differently” at the upcoming Mid-America Association for Computers in Education (MACE) conference on Friday March 7th. To register, clickhere.

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