What’s a Thesaurus? - Tech Learning

What’s a Thesaurus?

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Celebrate Peter Mark Roget’s birthday by watching this short video about how to use the thesaurus to improve your writing. Roget’s claim to fame was the compilation of words that were organized according to their meanings. The word, thesaurus, comes from the Greek for treasure chest or store house, an apt description for a book which is a treasure chest of synonyms and antonyms.

courtesy of Knovation

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