Editor's Desk - Tech Learning

Editor's Desk

Back in 2001, when we first took an in-depth look at laptop initiatives for schools ("Laptop Lessons: Exploring the Promise of One—to—One Computing," by Kim Carter, May 2001), it felt as if we were on the verge of the next big breakthrough. As is so often the case with technology, however, the ensuing
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Back in 2001, when we first took an in-depth look at laptop initiatives for schools ("Laptop Lessons: Exploring the Promise of One—to—One Computing," by Kim Carter, May 2001), it felt as if we were on the verge of the next big breakthrough. As is so often the case with technology, however, the ensuing three years have seen the laptop impact played out in a much more conservative and measured manner than seemed likely when we did that piece.

This month, executive editor Amy Poftak revisits the topic in a follow-up cover feature, "Getting Results with Laptops." In it, she checks in with laptop researcher Saul Rockman and in-the-trenches expert Domenic Grignano to illuminate the obstacles, positive results, and key conditions for success in implementing a laptop program. The article also profiles one of the many quiet revolutions that are taking place around the country, with a look at Grignano's New Haven elementary school.

Also this month, we are happy to bring you the usual tips and comparisons to assist you in buying decisions. Todd McIntire's Product Spotlight provides details on 20 digital projectors you'll want to consider, along with five important considerations for purchase. (You'll also see a banner alerting you to the fact that projectors is one of the subjects you can look forward to seeing covered in Digital Media in the Classroom, an e-guide soon to be appearing on techLEARNING.com.)

In our Reviews department, educator Ana Schwartzman also evaluates four of the newest software offerings for the ELL classroom. And in "Sound and Vision," reviews editor Michelle Thatcher reports on two schools that employ technology in creative ways to infuse the near-lost disciplines of music and art into their curricula.

As well, this month we roll out our annual T&L Readership Survey. Please take a minute to complete the survey in print or online. You may be the lucky winner of an Epson printer. In any event, we appreciate any suggestions and feedback that help us better meet your needs.

Lastly, October is a particularly key time of year for us as we celebrate two important extensions of our magazine. Our Tech Forum event in New York, which we like to think of as T&L in action, takes place on the 19th and features a richly packed line-up of topics and speakers. We're also very proud to be announcing the winners of our annual Ed Tech Leader of the Year program. These "best of the best" educators will be flown to NSBA's T+L2 conference in Denver where they'll receive hardware and software prizes and be recognized at a reception in their honor. Watch for profiles of their imaginative technology projects in our December Awards Issue.

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