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Winner of 2018 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge Aims To Improve Treatment For Pancreatic Cancer

Winner of 2018 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge Aims To Improve Treatment For Pancreatic Cancer

Discovery Education (@DiscoveryEd) and 3M (@3M) have named 13-year-old Rishab Jain the winner of the 2018 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge (#YoungScientist). Rishab created an algorithm to make pancreatic cancer treatment more effective by using artificial intelligence to accurately locate and track the pancreas in real-time during MRI radiotherapy.

Rishab developed and tested his algorithm using images of the human digestive system, and found it could correctly detect the pancreas with a 98.9 percent success rate. The innovation aims to improve accuracy, reduce invasiveness and increase efficiency during treatment, resulting in better quality of life and chance for survival among patients.

[T&L’S ISTE 2018 BEST OF SHOW AWARDS WINNERS]

A seventh-grader at Stoller Middle School in Portland, Ore., Rishab competed alongside nine other finalists during a live competition at the 3M Innovation Center in St. Paul, Minn. He was awarded the title of “America’s Top Young Scientist” and received a $25,000 prize.

The nine finalists received $1,000 and a variety of prizes from Discovery Education and 3M. The second, third and fourth runners-up also received a trip to a taping of a show on Discovery’s family of networks.

In second place: Mehaa Amirthalingam, an eighth-grader at Sartaria Middle School from Sugar Land, Texas, developed a toilet flushing system that uses both fresh and recycled water to reduce water consumption in the home.

In third place: Leo Wylonis, an eighth-grader at Tredyffrin-Easttown Middle School in Berwyn, Pa., designed a device for airplane wings that mimics the twisting motion of a bird in flight, increases fuel efficiency and reduces carbon emissions.

In fourth place: Sriram Bhimaraju, a sixth-grader at Harker Middle School in Cupertino, Calif., developed an Archery Assistant app that improves an archer’s accuracy by correcting form in real-time using a Bluetooth sensor.

For more information on the 2018 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge and to learn more about this year’s finalists, go to www.YoungScientistLab.com.