Do We Need Teacher Computer Stations?

Instead of trying to sustain classroom computers for students, we’re toying with the idea of outfitting every classroom with a teacher station that includes a computer, a projection device, an interactive whiteboard, and a personal response system (PRS) with enough devices for each student. Teachers can use the
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

Instead of trying to sustain classroom computers for students, we’re toying with the idea of outfitting every classroom with a teacher station that includes a computer, a projection device, an interactive whiteboard, and a personal response system (PRS) with enough devices for each student. Teachers can use the equipment for instruction and to get feedback from students using the PRS. It will also be less expensive to keep up. What do you think?

I think a teacher station as you describe can be very useful. However, I’m concerned about it’s being viewed as a replacement for student hardware. Why? Because this configuration will reinforce the Industrial Age model of the teacher as ‘sage on the stage’ and make it difficult for students to master 21st Century Skills such as Information Literacy.

Direct instruction and immediate feedback on students’ understanding of basic concepts are certainly important; however, students also need ready access to technology tools when other instructional strategies are used, such as project-based learning. How will this be achieved? There are solutions: mobile labs and handheld PCs are two options that are less expensive than placing multiple desktops in each classroom, but will still afford access where students are taking charge of their own learning and gaining critical skills.

Submitted by: Susan Brooks-Young

Next Tip: Showcasing Student Work Online

Featured

Related

Do We Need A National Computer Curriculum?

Recent studies have confirmed what many educators, politicians and concerned citizens have known for decades: that public education in the United States is generally inadequate when compared to other countries and is downright appalling in our inner cities.

Do We Need A National Computer Curriculum?

Recent studies have confirmed what many educators, politicians and concerned citizens have known for decades: that public education in the United States is generally inadequate when compared to other countries and is downright appalling in our inner cities.

Teachers and Computer Use

For the past few years I have been teaching an Introduction to Educational Technology course for undergraduates in a teacher education program. With some regularity my students, upon returning from field experiences, reported that teachers either were not using the computers available in their classrooms or were

How Do We Reach Them?

Spring is a time for renewal, hope, and a look toward the future. It can also be a time of apprehension and anxiety for both educators and students. The No Child Left Behind Act (2001) holds schools more accountable than ever. Educators are doing everything in their power to ensue that no child is left behind.

Do We Really Need Student Technology Standards?

Our new state technology plan format requires that the district provide a separate scope and sequence for student technology skills. I thought the whole idea was to embed these skills in content area teaching. Am I mistaken? Although students today are tech-savvy in many ways, most still require direct instruction

What Are You Doing In That Computer Lab?

from Educators' eZine --> "Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes"—Oscar Wilde If that's the case, I've had a lot of "experience" from bringing my students to the computer lab. For example: At