Double-click Frustration - Tech Learning

Double-click Frustration

Listen to the podcast Question: When I double-click a picture file, it doesn't open in the right program. Why is that? The IT Guy says: When you double-click a file, it doesn't always open in the expected application. That's because the operating system (Windows or the Mac) has settings that tell the
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Question: When I double-click a picture file, it doesn't open in the right program. Why is that?

The IT Guy says:
When you double-click a file, it doesn't always open in the expected application. That's because the operating system (Windows or the Mac) has settings that tell the computer what program "owns" those kinds of files. For instance, double-clicking a JPEG image file might open it in the Windows picture viewer or Preview on the Mac, or it might open Photoshop Elements.

There are three ways to address this. The first way is to first open the application that you want to use, and then find the file by going to File and choosing Open. That will open the file in the particular program that you are using.

The second option is to right-click on the file you want to open (CTRL-click on it with a Mac, or right-click it if you use a two-button mouse), and select Open with… and choose the application you want. That will open it that one time in the program you select.

To change it so it works every time you double-click the file, right click on it and select Properties (on a Mac, CTRL-click and select Get info). In the dialog box that opens will be a setting for which application opens the file. There will be a button next to the listing that lets you choose another application, and a place to select Always use the selected program to open this kind of file (or words to that effect). From now on that application will open this kind of file when you double-click it. Or at least until someone resets it when you aren't looking!

Next Tip: Photo Downloader Annoyance

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