Philip Tan Boon Yew - Tech Learning

Philip Tan Boon Yew

 Philip Tan Boon Yew is the executive director for the U.S. operations of the Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab
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Philip Tan Boon Yew is the executive director for the U.S. operations of the Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab, a game research initiative hosted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is concurrently a project manager for the Media Development Authority of Singapore. He has served as a member of the steering committee of the Singapore chapter of the International Game Developers Association. He has produced and designed PC online games at The Education Arcade, a research group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that studied and created educational games. His specialties include digital, live-action and tabletop game design, production and management.

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