The Idea Bank - Tech Learning

The Idea Bank

from Technology & Learning Find tips from experienced grant writers online. Whether you’re writing your first grant proposal or are a seasoned veteran, it’s useful to glean ideas from other writers. If you work in a large district, you may have a staff writer who can provide assistance. However,
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from Technology & Learning

Find tips from experienced grant writers online.

Whether you’re writing your first grant proposal or are a seasoned veteran, it’s useful to glean ideas from other writers. If you work in a large district, you may have a staff writer who can provide assistance. However, educators in smaller districts need not despair, because the Internet hosts a variety of sites designed to help you develop strong proposals. Here is a sampling of worthwhile online resources.

Grants Concept/Proposal Enhancement Guide (PDF): The California Department of Conservation (www.consrv.ca.gov) offers this concise, common sense guide for getting and staying organized throughout the proposal writing process. Fledgling grant writers will want to keep this four-page document within reach at all times. Experienced writerswill find useful reminders as well.The guide addresseseight topics, ranging from “Getting Started’ to ‘Partnerships and Community Support.”

A Guide to Proposal Planning and Writing (PDF): Jeremy T. Miner and Lynn E. Miner wrote this 12-page guide that provides links to essential government funding sites and gives advice about how to find grants supported by private agencies. Be sure to read the suggested strategies for gaining a competitive edge, such as contacting previous grantees and proposal reviewers or speaking with the program officer. The guide also includes a sample proposal letter to use when contacting a foundation.

Writing Successful Grants KnowledgeBase: This site was established through a partnership between the former Region VII Comprehensive Center at the University of Oklahoma and Northrop Grumman Information Technology. Although the project ended in 2005, the wealth of information presented here makes it worth bookmarking and using. The Master Resource List provides links to checklists, tools, guidelines, and tips that will remain relevant for some time to come.

Nonprofit Guides: This site provides free grant writing tools for nonprofit organizations (including schools). Topics include general tips, writing preliminary and full proposals, sample proposals, and links to additional resources.

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