BLOG BITS - Tech Learning

BLOG BITS

The simple act of turning desks into circles so that students talk to each other about important topics—while their teacher takes a back seat—can go a long way.
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The simple act of turning desks into circles so that students talk to each other about important topics—while their teacher takes a back seat—can go a long way.
—Libby Woodfin

Personalization is often used in the edtech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace. The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises. For many educators that’s not the true meaning of “personalized learning.”
—Katrina Schwartz

The power of collective capacity is that it enables ordinary people to accomplish extraordinary things.
—Greg Anrig

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