EDITORS DESK: SCHOOL IS OUT, LEARNING IS IN

One of the many myths about the education profession is that you “get the summer off.”
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One of the many myths about the education profession is that you “get the summer off.” Just by picking up this magazine, you prove that particular stereotype false. Many of you may be reading this right now in Denver at #ISTE2016, using your “summer off” to attend or present at sessions and workshops geared to professional development. Most of you will also be creating curricula and budgets to prepare for classes come fall—hopefully from a laptop on a lakefront or beach!

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We’re here to help. This special double summer issue of Tech&Learning is packed with information and insights to tackle both the granular and the global picture of education technology. First for the gear:, we surveyed a number of our advisors at our most recent SchoolCIO Summit on their first impressions of Apple’s iOS9.3, contributor Tara Smith goes deeper into the tools districts are using to manage the multitude of devices that have invaded schools; and, of course, our usual hands-on tests of tech. Then there are the ideas: how about visiting lectures via holograms or ensuring digital equity?

Want to keep learning in real time? Bookmark Tech&Learning Live @ISTE (www.techlearning.com/tltechlive), where we will be culling the best bits of insight from the year’s biggest edtech event. Here’s wishing you a fun and productive summer!

— Kevin Hogan
Content Director
khogan@nbmedia.com

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EDITORS DESK: GROUP THINK

One of the many things that make this job both inspiring and fun is the opportunity to interact with readers—educators who over the years have become trusted advisors and contributors.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: CHANGE IS GOOD! (RIGHT?)

What a difference an issue can make! When the Tech&Learning editors began planning this year-end double issue, little did we know how much the landscape of education technology and public education would tilt, at least when it comes to the influence of the Department of Education (or what may eventually remain of it).

Editors' Desk

Besides that it's just plain fun, one of the great things about using digital video as a teaching tool is that it's not subject to the same whimsical, de-flavorizing censorship that textbooks are. Since parents aren't likely to see a textbook reviewed in say, the New York Times, it's probably not common knowledge to