New Research: Schools Can Raise Student Achievement and Lower Education Costs - Tech Learning

New Research: Schools Can Raise Student Achievement and Lower Education Costs

One-to-One Institute today announced the results of a three-year study of both the academic and financial implications of educational technology.
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One-to-One Institute today announced the results of a three-year study of both the academic and financial implications of educational technology. Project RED Phase III suggests that, despite 35 years of research and data and $100 billion spent on technology in schools, education has largely failed to capitalize on technology to drive dramatic improvements in student achievement.

Project RED Phase III builds on the initial study of 997 schools, with a three-year study of 37,000 students and 2,200 teachers in 20 high-performing “Project RED Signature Districts.” This phase, coupled with the results of Phase I and Phase II, examines the following questions: What if a state could dramatically improve student academic performance while simultaneously reducing the financial burden of public education?

· Academic growth in study schools outpaced that of their respective state counterparts.

· Graduation rates increased in 79% of reporting districts.

· Reductions in disciplinary actions were reported by 84% of the districts.

· Ongoing use of formative-assessment data remains a major opportunity to drive academic improvement.

· Maximizing outcomes requires the match of appropriate pedagogy to the desired learning.

· Hard data is now available detailing potential financial savings. Technology can be revenue positive at the state level. 

A series of Project RED Briefs are scheduled to be published in the first half of 2017. The overview and first brief on Leadership is available now at www.projectred.org/pr-briefs.

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