Social Media in Schools Debate Continues

Who doesn’t like a good flame war? Scott McLeod and Annie Murphy Paul have a good one going right now on the use of social media in school.
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0
Who doesn’t like a good flame war? Scott McLeod and Annie Murphy Paul have a good one going right now on the use of social media in school.

Who doesn’t like a good flame war? Scott McLeod and Annie Murphy Paul have a good one going right now on the use of social media in school. The back and forth stems from Paul’s post on the Hechinger Report last week called “Why schools’ efforts to block the Internet are so laughably lame.” Here’s the nut: “What is predictable is that young people, given the chance, will use the web for social and entertainment purposes; what’s practical is to remove that temptation during the school day.” McLeod’s response on his blog Dangerously Irrelevant: “This article misses the point. It’s fear mongering that feeds the misbegotten ‘kids these days are bad’ narratives that are so prevalent in older generations. It’s yet another example of ‘we’re not knowledgeable enough to think of any useful ways to utilize these tools so let’s just block them.’” What's your take? Leave a comment below. —Kevin Hogan, Content Director 

Featured

Related

Image placeholder title

Social Media and Personal Learning Communities in Schools

A Resource Link blog post from last September gives a great overview of how social media can help teachers grow their personal learning communities. Social media allows us to connect not only to those we know, but also to those who we don’t know, but who share our passions, our interests and our profession." Roberts and Pruitt, in their book Schools as Professional Learning Communities (p3, 2009) quote research that suggests that the major obstacle for schools who wish to develop as learning communities is the provision of resources such as time to collaborate, leadership support, information and ready access to colleagues. Social Media is not the total answer; but in schools where money and time are in short demand (and which school isn’t in this situation?), they can go part of the way in meeting these needs. Here's how: 1. Social media providing time to collaborate 2. Social media providing leadership support 3. Social media providing information 4. Social media providing ready access to colleagues Learn more here. Not comfortable with your social media skills? Atomic Learning can help. Check out our training on Facebook and Twitter, and workshops on Facebook for Educators and Facebook for Students.