'Secrets' of High-Quality Interactive Learning Content

Brought to you by     Wednesday March 23, 2011 | 1 pm PST 4 pm EST Click here to register for this free webinar Interactive lesson planning is much like what we were taught when we first learned how to
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Wednesday March 23, 2011 | 1 pm PST / 4 pm EST

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Interactive lesson planning is much like what we were taught when we first learned how to write lesson plans. The only difference is that now we have the power of interactivity to incorporate into our lesson design. It opens the realm of possibilities to tap into every student’s unique learning style, otherwise known as differentiation. Planning is not arbitrary but skillful, with deliberate decisions being made every step of the way.

The first part of this webinar will discuss the primary features of high-quality interactive lessons, including student-focused learning objectives that are observable and measureable, assessment that is appropriate to the objectives, and giving the learner numerous opportunities to practice the skill that we want them to be able to apply. Other features to be discussed include sequencing of content from easy-to-difficult and simple-to-complex, and designing lesson layouts that are clean and uncluttered.

The second part of this webinar will show examples of real lessons that illustrate these principles. Mimio Master Tracy Tishion will lead the group through these lessons and share her own experiences with high- and low-quality digital content being used in schools today.

On completion of this webinar, attendees should be able to:
• Identify examples of student objectives that are observable and unobservable;
• Write student-focused learning objectives that are observable and measureable;
• Identify examples of assessment that are overt and covert;
• Write assessment items that are overt and appropriate for the objectives;
• Write at least three additional characteristics of quality content

Presenter

Tracy Tishion, K-12 Technology Resources Instructor, Brookfield Public Schools, CT
From the first day that her district acquired computers, in the early 1980s, Tracy embraced technology to find new and innovative ways to engage students and enhance their learning. Her ultimate goal has always been to prepare students as best she can for our ever-evolving digital society. This was one of the factors that led to her being awarded one of her district's Teacher of the Year Awards for 2003. Tracy has authored and delivered over 50 presentations on the local, state (Connecticut Educators Computer Association and Apple Education conferences), and national (NSTA) levels, to a variety of audiences. She is eager to share her district's experiences with fellow colleagues regionally and internationally on the benefits of IWB technologies.

Also Presenting

Dr. Karen Mahon is an educational psychologist and instructional designer who specializes in the development of effective learning programs for students of all ages and abilities. Dr. Mahon has conducted numerous research studies examining how students best learn. Some of that work was supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Education. She has received grants totaling nearly $4 million from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to develop software-based instructional programs, and has presented extensively, both nationally and internationally, on this topic. For more than 15 years she has conducted teacher training in the principles of effective instruction. Dr. Mahon received her B.A. from the University of California, San Diego, and her M.A. and Ed.D. from West Virginia University. Karen is currently Product Manager – Content Strategy for DYMO/Mimio Interactive Teaching Technologies.

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