A Complex Divide - Tech Learning

A Complex Divide

Once perceived as a simple matter of computer access, the digital divide has evolved into a much more complex affair. Conversations about the divide now include age, income, race, geography, special needs, parental status, hardware, IT, bandwidth, professional development, district size, and more. In this month's
Author:
Publish date:

Once perceived as a simple matter of computer access, the digital divide has evolved into a much more complex affair. Conversations about the divide now include age, income, race, geography, special needs, parental status, hardware, IT, bandwidth, professional development, district size, and more.

In this month's cover feature, "Inside the Divide," on Judy Salpeter traces the progress of efforts to narrow the chasm since it was first flagged as a major issue by the U.S. Department of Commerce 10 years ago. Unfortunately, many of the federal initiatives that have given ed tech a leg up in the past are in continuing danger of being cut. At press time, for instance, the Enhancing Education Through Technology program sits on the chopping block, despite President Bush's stated commitment to drive globally competitive programs in our schools. More than ever, your advocacy through professional groups such as CoSN , ISTE, and other public and private organizations remains crucial to the future — and the present — of education.

Taking our usual approach to problem solving, this month we offer you the lowdown on computers on wheels (COWS), a product that has played an important role in facilitating the one-to-one computing environments that have helped bridge the divide. See "A La Carts." Also, Iris Obille Lafferty takes a look at Riverdeep's latest tween-targeted reading program, Destination Reading Course III, and Mike Brown reviews PLATO's Earth and Space Science.

And brand new from the T&L family of products is the School CIO Web site, which offers the latest on school business processes, systems integration, ROI, and other topics central to today's cutting-edge district-wide administration. Finally, we look forward to meeting you at one of our upcoming Tech Forum events. Visit www.techlearning.com/techforum for details about our April shows in Florida and Chicago.

Featured

Related

Simple and Complex Machines

Simple and Complex Machines Using some animation and a droll story-line, the site attempts to teach students about simple machines such as "Wedge and Lever," "Ramp and Pulley," and "Wheel and Axle." Teachers may want to first visit the "Teachers' Overview" section for teaching tips, standards,

Study: ATOS an effective measure of text complexity

Renaissance Learning announced today that ATOS, the readability formula incorporated in the Accelerated Reader program, was found in an independent study to be a valid, reliable measure of text complexity as required by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts.

Finding Funding: A Dozen Daring Ideas

As state coffers continue to shrink this year, there is less money for education and much of what is available is earmarked for mandates. Without deep pockets anywhere, districts have to think strategically and look for even more creative ways to fund their priorities. The money is out there if you know how to look

Special Needs, Social Computing & The Digital Divide

from Educators' eZine Albert Einstein once said, "Computers are incredibly fast, accurate and stupid; humans are incredibly slow, inaccurate and brilliant; together they are powerful beyond imagination." When most educators think of special education and technology, too often they think only of assistive and

Freedom: A History of US

Name: Freedom: A History of US Brief Description of the Site: Based on Joy Hakim's critically acclaimed book this PBS television series come with a remarkable web site to study American history. The site follows the series sequence and is divided into "Webisodes". Access to the book and the series would be nice

Manage complex wireless networks

Many schools today have heterogeneous wireless networks that require IT administrators to manage multiple systems from different  vendors, with multiple architectures and  management consoles.

Inside The Divide

It has been slightly more than a decade since the U.S. Department of Commerce's NTIA division published its first major report on home computer access, "Falling through the Net: A Survey of the 'Have Nots' in Rural and Urban America." Published in July 1995, the report focused on serious gaps in the levels of