Beliefs About Adult Learners - Tech Learning

Beliefs About Adult Learners

Tip: Adults as learners are different from children. If you are a K-12 teacher and have ever taught a workshop for your colleagues, you know what I mean. You will be more successful if you consider the following. Adults: Some of the ideas I've come up with include: Usually come to the session wanting to
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Adults as learners are different from children. If you are a K-12 teacher and have ever taught a workshop for your colleagues, you know what I mean. You will be more successful if you consider the following. Adults:

Some of the ideas I've come up with include:

  • Usually come to the session wanting to learn.
  • Have pre-conceived beliefs on what they will learn and cannot learn.
  • Need a variety of learning styles to keep them on track.
  • May have problems starting all over and unlearning what they already know.
  • Have experiences and knowledge that they would like to build on.
  • May have other things on their mind when you are talking.
  • Like to have a say in what will be taught at the session.
  • Want the content to be relevant to what they teach.
  • Would like to learn in a non-threatening environment.
  • Need to be challenged and may like to challenge the presenter and content.
  • Enjoy asking questions - some more than others.
  • Appreciate constructive feedback.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

Next Tip: What Adults Retain

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