Changing Default Web Browser in Windows - Tech Learning

Changing Default Web Browser in Windows

Question: My default browser is IE6. However, when I am on the Internet and I click a hypertext link, my Netscape browser goes into action. What's with that?? How do I fix it? The IT Guy says: It is unusual for a hypertext link you are viewing within Internet Explorer to open Netscape. Generally links within a
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Question: My default browser is IE6. However, when I am on the Internet and I click a hypertext link, my Netscape browser goes into action. What's with that?? How do I fix it?

The IT Guy says:
It is unusual for a hypertext link you are viewing within Internet Explorer to open Netscape. Generally links within a browser will open within that same browser. However, it can happen if you save a bookmark or favorite from your browser into My Documents, your desktop, or another location on your hard drive, and then double click that icon. The reason a different browser other than IE could open is because your default web browser may have been set to be Netscape. This happens when you installed the Netscape browser. Whenever a new program is installed on a Windows computer, often the program will give you an option or by default "take over" ownership of certain file types. Making a system change, where the assignment of the default program used when a file with a particular extension is opened is changed, does this.

You can view the default programs for different file types in Windows XP by opening a new window (like opening My Computer), clicking on the TOOLS menu, and choosing FOLDER OPTIONS. Then click the tab for FILE TYPES. A list of all different file extensions and the software program set to open that file type by default will be displayed.

Rather than change the file assignment in that window, however, I recommend changing your default web browser back to IE (in Windows XP using IE6) by opening Internet Explorer, and from the TOOLS menu selecting INTERNET OPTIONS. Click on the PROGRAMS tab, and at the bottom of the window click the check-box beside "Internet Explorer should check to see whether it is the default browser." Also check to make sure Netscape is not selected as the default program for newsgroups, email, or any of the other menu selections. If it is, that could explain why Netscape launches from within Internet Explorer. Then close Internet Explorer. Reopen IE, and when prompted if you want to make IE your default web browser, choose yes.

If this does not fix the problem, I would recommend that you uninstall Netscape and reinstall the full version of IE. You can download it from www.microsoft.com/windows/ie.

Next Tip: Novell Default Login Change

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