Create a KWHL Chart using Word

Tip: There are different graphic organizers. KWHL charts are excellent tools to access prior information and to develop a plan for investigation. You can use tables in Word and Draw Table to merge and format cells to graphically depict ideas. Open a new Word document. Click Insert Table on the Standard
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Tip:
There are different graphic organizers. KWHL charts are excellent tools to access prior information and to develop a plan for investigation. You can use tables in Word and Draw Table to merge and format cells to graphically depict ideas.

  1. Open a new Word document.
  2. Click Insert Table on the Standard Toolbar.
  3. Drag to select 4 columns and 2 rows.
  4. Type a K in the first cell, tab and type W in next, H in next, and L in last cell.
  5. Select this first row.
  6. Go to the Table menu to Draw Table.
  7. Click on Align Top Left and go to Align Center.
  8. With the row still selected, bold the text.
  9. Click on the down arrow next to the paint can on the Draw Table toolbar and select Gray 10%.
  10. Tab to next row and type the following:
  11. Tab to add another row.
  12. Tab across until you add six more rows.
  13. Select the last row.
  14. Go to Draw Table and click Merge Cells.
  15. In this last cell, type in bold type: Attributes or characteristics we expect to use:
  16. Press Return to make the row larger.
  17. Choose the double line from the line style in Draw Table.
  18. Draw the border with the pencil (Draw Table).

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

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