Dealing with Resistant Teachers - Tech Learning

Dealing with Resistant Teachers

Tip: Change is difficult! From my experience, real change takes three to five years. Teachers that use technology probably have been using it for some time. Refer to the earlier tip on Stages of Concern to determine what level your teachers are on. However, you may have teachers at different levels, not just the
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Change is difficult! From my experience, real change takes three to five years. Teachers that use technology probably have been using it for some time. Refer to the earlier tip on Stages of Concern to determine what level your teachers are on. However, you may have teachers at different levels, not just the teacher at the “Awareness†level, who may be resistant about moving to the next level.

  • Listen and let the teacher talk. If you do all the talking, they will not get the opportunity to voice their concerns.
  • Ask questions such as why, what, and how to show real interest.
  • Avoid judging if they are right or wrong.
  • Recognize their ideas and opinions even if they are different than yours.
  • Accept that their resistance is not personal or toward you. Usually the resistance becomes an emotional issue and their position may not even make sense.
  • Find areas where you can agree so they feel that they are being listened to.
  • Use “I†messages such as “I hear how you feel,†nod your head in agreement, look in their eyes, and smile to ease any tension.
  • Avoid arguing, or you can increase resistance. If you realize your relationship will not work, find someone else to work with this teacher.

The best thing is to think positively about your program and the people who are part of it, even your resistant teachers.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

Next Tip: Guiding Change for the Informational Stage

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