How Proficient Are Participants? - Tech Learning

How Proficient Are Participants?

Tip: It’s important to know workshop participants’ proficiency levels, but how do you figure it out? Here are two ways you can ask participants to give you a quick assessment: For each technology or activity, ask participants to hold up five fingers if they use that technology with students, three if they’re
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It’s important to know workshop participants’ proficiency levels, but how do you figure it out? Here are two ways you can ask participants to give you a quick assessment:

  • For each technology or activity, ask participants to hold up five fingers if they use that technology with students, three if they’re comfortable using it themselves, and no fingers if they do not use it.
  • Provide different color index cards or post-its to each participant. Have them hold up one color for integration, other colors for personal use, and a different color for no use.

Either of these strategies provides the facilitator a quick way to assess the proficiency levels of participants and see where they are sitting. You can group same levels together or encourage those at higher levels to sit with someone who might need assistance. If participants see that they are sitting next to someone more experienced, they ask for help or might help each other. This is a great way to encourage collaboration.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

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