How to Use Case Studies - Tech Learning

How to Use Case Studies

Tip: Case studies are effective as a pedagogical technique for teaching content and as opportunities for teachers to experience problems in a variety of professional settings. Find or create a case study that focuses on a problem that is relevant to your teachers' or administrators' situations. Create or find a
Author:
Publish date:

Tip:
Case studies are effective as a pedagogical technique for teaching content and as opportunities for teachers to experience problems in a variety of professional settings.

  • Find or create a case study that focuses on a problem that is relevant to your teachers' or administrators' situations.
  • Create or find a website or print out copies of the case study for each teacher.
  • Review with the teachers the steps you would like them to take as they read the study, how much time to take, and how they will check for understanding.
  • Include an essential question about the problem that has no right or wrong answer.
  • Allow teachers time to take notes as they read the study and consider how they might answer the question.
  • Brainstorm other questions about the problem with the whole group.
  • Put teachers in small groups of 4 or more by asking them to count off by 1-4+ and grouping all the 1s, 2s, and so on together.
  • Ask one person to be facilitator for each group and have them answer the questions.
  • Have someone report out from each group trying not to duplicate answers going over each question.
  • Take notes as groups report out and then summarize the discussions correlating theory and teaching practice.

Janice Friesen shared that she has used modified case studies in professional development. One thing that is important is that the case study should be open ended. In a way it is more like using stories than actually sharing research. In a PD session, different case studies would be given to small groups and they would read and discuss them. Then we would come together and share what solutions and suggestions the groups came up with. This is sometimes a great way to start a session and get teachers thinking about the topic that will be presented.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray
with ideas from Janice Friesen

Next Tip: Organizing your Resources

Featured

Related

Designing Effective Case Studies

Tip: A case study may be a realistic scenario at a school that may highlight a specific problem relevant to the participating teachers. Teachers can use a case study to resolve the problem using pedagogy, theory, and practical solutions. A good case study: Covers one area of theory. Focuses on a specific

What Makes a Good Case Study?

Tip: Teachers can develop or use case studies for their professional development program. However, a case study is not just collecting information about a program or writing about how a lesson was implemented and affected student achievement. A good case study: Is usually designed around a realistic situation and

Case Studies: Mobile learning devices hold promise

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) today, as part of its Value of Investment (VOI) Leadership Initiative, released two new case studies which explore the implementation of student mobile learning device pilot projects in two Texas school districts

Case Study: Special Education

How do you reach students with a 36-75 IQ? The answer is technology. It has been the answer for my class of nineteen developmentally delayed high school students. I have created a Web-based curriculum that matches their IEP goals and objectives as well as the NYS Alternate Assessment. The page is a combination of Web

Case Study: Learning With Tablet PCs

Choosing the Right Tools Bishop Hartley has long been a technically savvy learning institution where it is believed that a student’s opportunity to learn is enhanced by greater mobility and greater access to information. Our students are used to a mobile environment. To utilize this mobility, students need

Case Study: Rural Alabama School District’s Turnaround

A new case study released today by the Alliance for Excellent Education demonstrates how one predominantly low-income school district improved student engagement in the classroom and increased high school graduation rates through project-based learning (PBL) and the effective use of technology.

Interactive Case Studies: Cyberbullying

This collection of stories describes different acts of cyberbullying and possible consequences. The stories are accompanied by statistics, poll questions and results, and tips to help children talk to adults when they are threatened or hurt by cyberbullies. Many of