Professional Development for Whom?

I am a classroom teacher who also provides technical support at my elementary school. On several occasions the principal has enrolled in a technology-related workshop and then sent me in her place. I’ve just attended the first session of a technology leadership workshop series. It was interesting, but the
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I am a classroom teacher who also provides technical support at my elementary school. On several occasions the principal has enrolled in a technology-related workshop and then sent me in her place. I’ve just attended the first session of a technology leadership workshop series. It was interesting, but the curriculum is geared toward principals and she needs to hear what’s being said! What can I do?

Many school administrators are on overload these days and other priorities often get in the way. There are occasions when sending a designee to a meeting or workshop is appropriate, but it sounds as though this isn’t one of those times. Now that you’ve attended the first meeting, you might share the information presented and discuss your concerns with the principal. Explain why you think this training would benefit her, and the school.

By the way, you also have research on your side. More than one study has shown that the principal’s participation in professional development related to technology integration has a direct, positive impact on the quality of technology use at the site.

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