Reflecting on Student Work

Tip: Teachers may not realize that examining student work with other teachers is an effective professional development opportunity which facilitates the improving of teaching practice. Encourage your teachers to bring lessons that involve higher-order thinking skills. Avoid work that consists primarily of
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Tip:
Teachers may not realize that examining student work with other teachers is an effective professional development opportunity which facilitates the improving of teaching practice.

  • Encourage your teachers to bring lessons that involve higher-order thinking skills.
  • Avoid work that consists primarily of answers with little explanation.
  • At times it may be useful to share several pieces of student work that show different approaches to the same assignment. Start with a practice session with a lesson that does not belong to one of the teachers in the group.
  • Bring in the initial assignment with learning objectives, including any assessment strategies such as rubrics, checklists, etc.
  • Select samples of student work that show contrast in response to the same assignment.
  • Remove all names from the samples and make copies for each teacher.
  • Prepare questions about the work such as: How can I get better quality presentations? or a question that narrows on specifics , such as: Do you see evidence that the student understands the literature?
  • Discuss with whole group strategies for improving or changing the lesson.
  • Next session, ask a teacher to be the facilitator and to share their lesson and sample work.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

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