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Here it is again, that time of year when we toast to auld lang syne, whatever that means, and make promises we most likely can’t keep.
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Here it is again, that time of year when we toast to auld lang syne, whatever that means, and make promises we most likely can’t keep. For 2012, rather than fall back on the usual diet and exercise attempts (no fun in that), I will focus on a few resolutions concerning our editorial coverage in Tech & Learning.

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First, some semantics: This year we resolve to banish the phrase professional development from these pages. It’s a bothersome expression that does more to confuse than explain. Instead we will refer to “professional learning” when discussing education for educators. A small distinction, perhaps, but one I hope you encourage us to maintain.

Now, for something more substantial: I like to think that we do a pretty good job of keeping it real around here. No breathless announcements of how technology will solve it all. Very few exclamation points punctuating “revolutionary 21st-century transformations,” blah, blah, blah. Sometimes, however, the geek does get the better of us. That’s why we’re using this month’s cover story, “How It’s Done,” as a benchmark for our future editorial coverage. Expect the value of our stories to be not the tech itself but how fellow educators use it to their advantage.

Finally, be ready for a new Tech&Learning look and feel both in print and online over the coming weeks. We expect that our redesigns will help tie together our day-to-day coverage on the Web and our monthly print analysis. Also, what better time than the new year for a makeover? As always, I would love to hear your feedback. Email me at khogan@nbmedia.com.

Happy New Year!

P.S. Auld lang syne means “times gone by.” I googled it.

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Kevin Hogan
Editorial Director

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