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Secure Password Suggestions - Tech Learning

Secure Password Suggestions

Question: What suggestions do you have for teachers and students needing to create secure passwords? The IT Guy says: Bad, or insecure, passwords include things like your name, your nickname, any personal information like your address or favorite things, your school mascot, or basically any word found in the
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Question: What suggestions do you have for teachers and students needing to create secure passwords?

The IT Guy says:
Bad, or insecure, passwords include things like your name, your nickname, any personal information like your address or favorite things, your school mascot, or basically any word found in the dictionary.

To create a secure password, use at least eight characters and include a mix of both letters and numbers, with some capitalized letters. If you can substitute numbers in a word that you can remember, that can be effective. An example would be, instead of using the word “bottle,” use “b0tt1e”, substituting a zero for the letter o and the number one for the letter l. Do not use the same password for your professional and personal accounts, and rotate the passwords you use regularly.

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