Three Summer School Success Stories With Online Learning

Edgenuitytoday announced several new examples of schools and districts where it has partnered to help provide successful summer school programs:

· In 2012, Bedford Public Schools in Bedford, Virginia used Edgenuity’s courses during an eight-week blended learning summer school program for high school students.

-61 high school studentstook an English language arts course.

-100% of studentsenrolled in the program passed their courses by the end of the summer.

-12of these students also took the 2012 Virginia Standards of Learning End-of-Course (EOC) reading and writing tests; 100% passed the EOC exam in reading and 92% passed the EOC exam in writing.

· In 2013, Richmond County School Systemin Richmond County, Georgia implemented a six-week blended learning summer school program to give teenage parents, students in foster care, students with mental health concerns, and at-risk high school students who previously failed courses a second chance to learn subject matter and recover academic credits.

-126 studentsparticipated in the program, attending school for two 130-minute classes two days per week and completing two hours of Edgenuity coursework from home after school.

-Teachers used data from Edgenuity’s learning management system to assess student work and provide practice and remediation when needed.

-With the encouragement of five subject area learning facilitators, enrollees completed 86% of their Edgenuity courses with passing grades.

· In 2013, Hays Consolidated Independent School District in Kyle, Texas implemented an optional blended learning summer school program for ninth and tenth graders who did not pass their spring 2013 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness End-of-Course (STAAR EOC) tests.

-124 students from Hays High School and Lehman High School took English language arts courses.

-After six weeks enrolled in Edgenuity courses, CISD summer school students retaking the STAAR EOC tests demonstrated significant gains.

-Students who took the English I Reading test saw an average increase of 56 points, from 1739 to 1795, and those who took the English II Reading test saw an average increase of 124 points, from 1763 to 1887. Students who took the English I Writing test saw an average increase of 122 points, from 1724 to 1846, and those who took the English II Writing test saw an average increase of 133 points, from 1747 to 1880.

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