TL News(6) - Tech Learning

TL News(6)

Technology Rich Elementary Schools Elementary schools in Greenville, TN offer a technology rich environment, including interactive white boards, digital cameras and laptop computers. Students enjoy using the technology and are gaining skills they will need to succeed in a world increasing reliant on technology. Iris
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  • Technology Rich Elementary Schools
    Elementary schools in Greenville, TN offer a technology rich environment, including interactive white boards, digital cameras and laptop computers. Students enjoy using the technology and are gaining skills they will need to succeed in a world increasing reliant on technology.
  • Iris Scanning Technology Controls School Access
    Elementary schools in New Jersey’s Freehold Borough School District identify each parent, teacher, administrator, or school employee who gains access to the schools by taking a digital photograph of the person’s iris and comparing it to an image stored in a computer database.
  • Chicago Plans Illinois’ First Virtual School
    The Chicago Board of Education has approved the creation of the Chicago Virtual Charter School. If approved by the Illinois State Board of Education, the new schools will become the first online school in the state of Illinois.
  • Students Get Hands-On Experience in Technology Class
    The clamor from the technology class at Lakota East High School is evidence that the students are busily engaged in hand-on learning, applying the math and science they are learning in other classes to real-world applications.
  • Creating Graphical Passwords
    A team of scientists from Rutgers University has developed a password security solution that relies on images, which are easier for people to remember and harder for anyone else to guess.

Technology Rich Elementary Schools

Elementary schools in Greenville, TN offer their students a technology rich environment, including interactive white boards, digital cameras and laptop computers. In addition to using comprehensive software to support math and reading instruction, students use the Internet for research, view selections from a library of streaming video, and complete assignments using word processing and presentation software. Students also enjoy using the remote control devices that are included in the school’s Classroom Response System (CRP) to answer multiple-choice questions on classroom quizzes. Library card catalogs are computerized so that students can pull up information on any computer in the school. They can purchase lunch by using their school lunch account, which is stored on the cafeteria computer. E-mail has greatly increased communication between parents and teachers and parents can visit the various school Web site and to learn about the latest news from individual classrooms and the school in general. Several schools have broadcast studio that students use to produce a live news program that is transmitted throughout the school as part of the daily morning announcements.

Source:The Greeneville Sun

Iris Scanning Technology Controls School Access

Once a feature of futuristic spy movies, iris scanning has joined the roster of available security tools. Each of the three elementary schools in New Jersey’s Freehold Borough School District is using a system that takes a digital photograph of the iris, the color portion of the eye, each time a parent, teacher, administrator, or school employee gains access to the school. Comparing each photo against records in the database provides positive identification. Parents with children who attend any of the three schools, teachers who instruct students attending classes at the locations, and staff employees are assigned access rights. Four adults per child may be approved in the system. The database software runs on a computer in the office of each school and provides access controls, visitor management, and the capability to scan a driver's license from any state and automatically import the information into the database. Funding for the project, more than $369,000, was made possibly by a school safety grant through the National Institute of Justice, a research branch of the U.S. Department of Justice. School participation in the 18-month study is voluntary.

Source:TechWeb News

Chicago Plans Illinois’ First Virtual School

The Chicago Board of Education has approved the creation of the Chicago Virtual Charter School. If approved by the Illinois State Board of Education, the new schools will become the first online school in the state of Illinois. The school, which Chicago Public schools (CPS) hopes to open in the fall of 2006, would serve up to 6000 K-8 students. Students who enroll in the Chicago Virtual Charter School will use a mix of print, hands-on. and computer-based materials to cover the required curriculum. Students will be supervised by a parent or another adult. Their work will be reviewed by a certified online teacher who will provide personalized feedback and guidance. The district plans to have a physical location available so that teachers and students can meet face-to-face as necessary. CPS sees the virtual school as an alternative for students who are homebound, have been expelled, or who have trouble learning in traditional classroom. The Chicago Teachers Union strongly opposes the school, questioning how students who are not succeeding in the classroom can be expected to succeed in this less structured setting. According to the proposal presented to the Board, the program would cost $5,075 per student, including the cost of the district-provided computer, Internet access and printed materials.

Source:Sun Times

Students Get Hands-On Experience in Technology Class

The clamor from the technology class at Lakota East High School is evidence that the students are busily engaged in hand-on learning, according to teacher David Campbell. Campbell, a retired engineer, is also head coach of the robotics club. The technology class challenges students to apply the math and science they are learning to real-world applications. They also learn teamwork. The class has a history of building custom-made devices to aid the disabled. Currently, several students are working on building an adjustable table to attach to the wheelchair of a former Lakota East student who is paralyzed. The table will rotate, rise and adjust to perform a variety of tasks. In the past students have designed a card-sorting device for a vision-impaired man and a gripping device for use by another sight-impaired person to help stock groceries. Students are also building a robot for a national competition in which the robots will be required to shoot balls at a circular goal. Last year’s robot — a 120-pound, 5-foot-tall version — made it to the semi-finals of the competition.

Source:The Enquirer

Creating Graphical Passwords

Remembering your passwords and keeping them secure can be a real headache. A team of scientists from Rutgers University has developed a password security solution that relies on images. Instead of entering the letters and numbers that make up the typical password, users select areas of a picture, called “click points,†which are easier to remember and, due to the somewhat random selection process, more difficult for someone else to guess. The picture used for this solution needs to be fairly complex — like a landscape or cityscape — so that there are many possible click points. The user doesn’t have to click on the exact same point every time. The researchers have developed a three-grid system will allow users to click in a range of the original choice. Users never see the grid — it’s all in the computer. The same team has devised a more complex solution that looks and plays like a video game. The user selects 10 icons from a collection of 200 or so. These 200 icons than flow across the screen and the user is challenged to find a shape in the collection that uses his or her selected icons as its corner points. This operation is repeated 10 times. This system requires more user training and has the obvious drawback of taking considerably more time than merely entering a password. But with possible icon combinations in the billions, the security level it offers is high.

Source:CNET.com

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