We're Listening - Tech Learning

We're Listening

It's already two months into 2004 and Technology & Learning is moving forward rapidly — and we hope, nimbly — into this 24th year of our existence. The magazine you hold in your hand today is the product of ongoing interaction among members of our editorial team, our advisory board, and our readers. In 2003,
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It's already two months into 2004 and Technology & Learning is moving forward rapidly — and we hope, nimbly — into this 24th year of our existence. The magazine you hold in your hand today is the product of ongoing interaction among members of our editorial team, our advisory board, and our readers.

In 2003, we asked and you answered. In response to our Fall Readership Survey, you told us you were interested in emerging technologies, designing a new tech plan, and funding and TCO strategies. You also let us know we were on the right track with product purchasing guidance, how-to tips, and advice. So, in addition to a 2004 lineup of cover features including budgeting and TCO, mobile computing, distance learning, this month's "Drafting a Customized Tech Plan", and more, we have done a bit of tweaking to our regular departments as well.

You'll have no problem recognizing our Picks of the Month column under its new title Reviews. As always, we'll cover software, Web, and hardware products (look for a rundown on handhelds in late spring), but our new title should make it easier for new readers and Web searchers to find exactly what they're looking for. We've also combined Spotlight and Update to create the monthly Product Spotlight column. Here, we'll continue to offer descriptions, comparisons, analyses, and buying tips on a range of products to help you make more informed purchasing decisions.

In our long-running, popular Grants, Contests & Awards department, writer Susan Brooks-Young will still bring you monthly best bets, but will also offer additional special funding resources, as well as a funding-related tip from her considerable body of expertise on the subject. Also, we have changed the name of Jeffrey Branzburg's In-Service column to How-To, and revised the format to be more of a straightforward, quick-read process. How-To will also display some new flexibility in length — sometimes appearing as a half, third, or two-thirds page column, and will often include instructions to visit techlearning.com for a more detailed version.

All in all, our mission is to remain as responsive as ever to our readers. We hope the changes you'll find in the magazine will offer you, as busy educators, more and timelier information, additional purchasing and decision guidance, more in-depth analyses, and a variety of models and designs for the successful integration of technology into all facets of education.

Susan McLester, editor in chief, T&L smclester@cmp.com

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