Working with the Reluctant Adopter - Tech Learning

Working with the Reluctant Adopter

Tip: You know the teacher I'm talking about: the one who might say: I've taught this curriculum for 25 years and I'm not changing now. Every time I touch the computer it breaks, so I'm not touching it. It takes so long for all of my students to type their work that it's easier just having them write it in
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Tip:
You know the teacher I'm talking about: the one who might say:

  • I've taught this curriculum for 25 years and I'm not changing now.
  • Every time I touch the computer it breaks, so I'm not touching it.
  • It takes so long for all of my students to type their work that it's easier just having them write it in cursive.
  • I have so much curriculum to cover that I don't have time to use technology with my students.

As professional developers, we need to take in account all that teachers have on their plates plus change is difficult for many. We need to treat all teachers as professionals and provide personalized support:

  • Schedule time to meet with reluctant teachers in their classrooms.
  • Observe their classroom setup and their teaching practice.
  • Discuss with them their curriculum for the next month.
  • Create a simple lesson using technology and model it for them.
  • Observe them teaching the lesson.
  • Provide feedback and design another lesson with them.

Personal support will go a long way with your reluctant teachers. You may find that they will become your biggest advocate.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

Next Tip: Individual Learning Plans (ILPs)

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