Working with the Reluctant Adopter - Tech Learning

Working with the Reluctant Adopter

Tip: You know the teacher I'm talking about: the one who might say: I've taught this curriculum for 25 years and I'm not changing now. Every time I touch the computer it breaks, so I'm not touching it. It takes so long for all of my students to type their work that it's easier just having them write it in
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

Tip:
You know the teacher I'm talking about: the one who might say:

  • I've taught this curriculum for 25 years and I'm not changing now.
  • Every time I touch the computer it breaks, so I'm not touching it.
  • It takes so long for all of my students to type their work that it's easier just having them write it in cursive.
  • I have so much curriculum to cover that I don't have time to use technology with my students.

As professional developers, we need to take in account all that teachers have on their plates plus change is difficult for many. We need to treat all teachers as professionals and provide personalized support:

  • Schedule time to meet with reluctant teachers in their classrooms.
  • Observe their classroom setup and their teaching practice.
  • Discuss with them their curriculum for the next month.
  • Create a simple lesson using technology and model it for them.
  • Observe them teaching the lesson.
  • Provide feedback and design another lesson with them.

Personal support will go a long way with your reluctant teachers. You may find that they will become your biggest advocate.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

Next Tip: Individual Learning Plans (ILPs)

Featured

Related

Working with Reluctant Teachers

Many teachers feel overwhelmed with all the demands on their time, and some see technology as just one more thing on an already overloaded plate. There are solutions that staff developers can use to help them. A staff developer recently asked, "Teachers in my school are very unsure about the effective use of

Data Can Drive Development

Teaching practice can improve if teachers can look at themselves and student data in an objective manner. In most teacher education programs, teachers were not taught to use data to design curriculum and analyze their teaching practices. Teachers need training in both data management and data analysis as well as in

Does One-to-One Work? A Review of the Literature

from Educators' eZine --> How should we use technology in the classroom? So much time, money and effort is spent on placing technology into our classrooms but what works best? Should school districts be striving to get to the

Working Together

from Technology & Learning Google Apps goes to school. Imagine you're working with teachers in your school to put together a multidisciplinary curriculum. Or that you are advising a student organization on how to pull off a school-wide event. You have multiple teams working on tasks, emails flying back and

Professional Development Tips

The best way to help your teachers is to identify what they really need to ensure student success and to improve their teaching practice. How do you do this as a professional developer? Many times we do not have the luxury of time to get to know our teachers. Yet there may be a way we can do this as part of the

Working with Tables in Word

Tip: I have found that it is easier for the teachers and administrators with whom I work to put some of the data either in a spreadsheet or table so it is easier to understand. Use the following steps to easily and quickly add, manipulate, and modify the way the tables are formatted. Click on the Tables and

Making Online Assessment Work

from School CIO How K-12 technologists are prepping their infrastructures and staffs for Web-based testing. A test can cause a student to lose sleep, but Dave Matt had a nightmare of his own during an online assessment at Orange County Public Schools in rural Virginia. A faulty local area network switch inside a