Creating a Customized Professional Development Program, Part 4 - Tech Learning

Creating a Customized Professional Development Program, Part 4

In Part 1, we completed a 21st Century Skills Professional Development Worksheet to clarify the goals of our program. In Part 2, we looked at using an assessment to determine where skills training might be best applied. Part 3 looked
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In Part 1, we completed a 21st Century Skills Professional Development Worksheet to clarify the goals of our program. In Part 2, we looked at using an assessment to determine where skills training might be best applied. Part 3 looked at skills development itself. In the final segment of this series we'll discuss analyzing progress.

By looking at detailed reports generated by a training program such as Atomic Learning, we can see whether training has been completed by each individual. We can determine whether expectations were appropriate and identify any areas which might need more time investment.

Recall that the second purpose of the initial tech proficiency assessment was to set a benchmark for each individual. Now, with some training accomplished, it's time to reassess. By comparing initial and current assessment results, progress is measured directly.

How did your teachers improve? In what areas should they spend more time? Has this new knowledge been transferred to classrooms? Are the students responding well?

21st century professional development need not be complicated or costly. In fact, the right program saves districts money by bringing relevant, customizable training and reporting right to the teachers. Visit http://bit.ly/al21pd for more information on how Atomic Learning can revolutionize your professional development program and save your district money.

This concludes our series on customized professional development programs. Next time, learn how you can earn graduate course credits through IT4Educators.com and Atomic Learning.

P.D. Tips courtesy of Atomic Learning

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