EDITOR’S NOTE: THE SHOW MUST GO ON - Tech Learning

EDITOR’S NOTE: THE SHOW MUST GO ON

While ISTE may have ended weeks ago, the impact from this year’s largest edtech show in the United States is still settling in.
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While ISTE may have ended weeks ago, the impact from this year’s largest edtech show in the United States is still settling in. For the editors and advisors of Tech & Learning, this year’s event was one of the most fulfilling.

Where to start? First, there was our annual pre-ISTE Leadership Summit, which drew more than 50 administrators from districts around the country to discuss innovative ideas for schools. Look for those write-ups in next month’s issue. Then there was our intrepid group of reporter educators that scoured the show floor to decide on this year’s Best of ISTE awards (page 24), not an easy task! Our Leader of the Year party, sponsored by turnitin, hosted more than 100 of our esteemed readers and advisors, including newly minted ISTE CEO and T&L Most Influential honoree Richard Culatta. And to wrap things up, our all-star panel of district leaders discussed the finer points of digital equity in a special ISTE session the final morning of the conference.

You can find all of this reporting up on the Tech&Learning Live channel (www.techlearning.com/tltechlive/). Far from stale, the posts, links, and analysis of the show and our events serve as a terrific executive summary. But we’re not done yet! Be sure to log in for our Best of ISTE webinar Tuesday, August 28, at 2:00pm EST at techlearning.com, where yet another crew of our educator advisors will hash out their favorite takeaways from the show and how they are applying those experiences to their classrooms this fall. I hope you join us!

— Kevin Hogan
Content Director
khogan@nbmedia.com

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EDITOR’S NOTE: CHANGE IS GOOD! (RIGHT?)

What a difference an issue can make! When the Tech&Learning editors began planning this year-end double issue, little did we know how much the landscape of education technology and public education would tilt, at least when it comes to the influence of the Department of Education (or what may eventually remain of it).