3 Critical Things To Communicate to Stakeholders For Successful Technology Integration! - Tech Learning

3 Critical Things To Communicate to Stakeholders For Successful Technology Integration!

There are three critical things that we need to understand in order to be fully supportive of our district-wide mission to successfully implement technology K-12.
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As I am thinking about Technology Integration from the top down (starting at the Administrative Level), there are three critical things that we need to understand in order to be fully supportive of our district-wide mission to successfully implement technology K-12, and to create a self-sustaining culture of digitally literate learners and leaders. These steps are essentially a preview, or "glimpse," into my Final Stakeholder Project.

Step #1

First, it is critical to communicate our district-wide Technology model and plan for organizational Success. Click here to see the amazing Framework we found! Even though this is mostly used as a Literacy Model by Literacy Coaches, I like this model for technology, because every piece of the model is essential to what we do! To achieve Organizational Success, you MUST have the following components: VISION, SKILLS, INCENTIVES, RESOURCES, & an ACTION PLAN! If there is no VISION, everyone is CONFUSED! If no one has the SKILLS they need, everyone has ANXIETY! If people do not understand the INCENTIVES, only GRADUAL CHANGE will occur! If no one has the RESOURCES they need for support, everyone will be FRUSTRATED! And, if there is no ACTION PLAN, you will absolutely have a FALSE START!

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Step #2
Next, it is important to communicate and clarify District-Wide Technology Processes. When I say processes, I mean every process that keeps technology ticking on a daily basis. Currently, I have been working with every building staff to develop a list of "inefficient technology processes." Although it is hard to ask these questions, it is essential that we identify exactly where our inefficiencies are, in order to help us become more effective and efficient in our processes in the long run. In my end project, I will show you pictures of these building lists, and will tell you more about what we are doing to address each of the inefficient processes that our staff members are concerned about!

Step #3

Last, it is important to communicate the expectations & resources available for District-Wide Professional Development. Currently, I am developing a Technology Hub for our School District that includes the following: Tech Tips for Teachers (YouTube Channel of How-To Videos for everything we are implementing), Digital Resources, Communication regarding current roll-outs and initiatives, Video promotions, and more! This is also the place where my staff members come to request technology training. On this website they have access to my "Technology Integration Matrix For Teachers," which was developed last year by myself and fellow Technology Coaching Partner, Amy Neal (Technology Coach from DeKalb Central School Corporation). Other districts may certainly use this Matrix, but we politely ask that you attribute credit to the authors! (Kelly Clifford & Amy Neal)

cross-posted at cliffordtechnologycoach.blogspot.com

Kelly Clifford is the Technology Coordinator for Metropolitan School District of Steuben County, Indiana. Read more at her blog cliffordtechnologycoach.blogspot.com

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