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Best Buncee Tips and Tricks for Teachers

Buncee
(Image credit: Buncee)

Buncee tips and tricks are what can make an already useful digital tool even more helpful in the classroom and beyond. Yes, Buncee is an easy-to-use slideshow-style multimedia platform, but even that can benefit from some more creativity.

From videos and images to animations and emojis, there is a lot of media to pick from when building a Buncee. Sometimes that can be a little overwhelming. But with a few good ideas, from those who have used the platform before, effectively, you could find your way to Buncee brilliance as a teacher. 

These best Buncee tips and tricks aim to offer quick and easy ways to maximize student engagement and learning through using the tool. This includes making Buncees yourself, as a teacher, and also setting tasks for students to carry out in Buncee, too.

Read on to learn the best Buncee tips and tricks. It's also worth checking out the Buncee Ideas Lab, which has plenty of pre-built examples that you can easily copy and use yourself for free.

Buncee

(Image credit: Buncee)

Clip and stitch with Buncee

The clip and stitch feature is a hugely powerful part of Buncee. In reality, it's a very simple idea, effectively allowing you to copy and paste slides, or Buncees, from a presentation. For a class, it's a great way to build a collaborative piece of work.

Have students each work on an area of a subject, perhaps creating a history presentation, with each student focusing on a different aspect of event. Then, once submitted, you can clip and stitch slides from each student's work to create a new all-encompassing Buncee. This is a great way to build a one-stop-shop Buncee that can be used by the whole class to revise and learn from.

This technique is also a great way to build a selection of completed student work into a single Buncee. This can then be shared with parents and guardians as well as other faculty members to show how the class is progressing. 

Note: You will need to make sure each Buncee is set to "copyable." So get the students to do this before submitting to save you going through each one to turn on the feature that allows you to clip.

Use audio for a phonics lesson

Buncee

(Image credit: Buncee)

The great thing about Buncee is its ability to mix media. For that reason it's ideal if you want to cover something such as phonics, but with a visual element. As such, you can create a Buncee with lots of images, and a sound or letter theme. Then have the students each add an audio clip over the image to have that figure talk using the phonics. As shown above.

Here is a really good example of that you can use yourself in Buncee.

Use OneNote with Buncee

Buncee

(Image credit: Microsoft)

This image above shows how you can use Buncee within Microsoft OneNote, which offers lots of potential. One of the most basic options is for giving feedback to students as you can post comments on Buncees at an integrated level so each specific detail can be addressed. You can both praise and comment on every part of the process for the student. 

Since colorful text and cute images are available, you also can keep comments light, giving you space to offer constructive criticism without students feeling as if they've done something wrong. 

Keep class safety clear using Buncee

Buncee

(Image credit: Buncee)

Buncee doesn't have to just be for direct learning of curriculum content. It can also be used to keep students engaged with topics that they might otherwise find less interesting. This is perfect in the case of lab safety, in which the lessons are important to learn but often students switch off when you try to share the details.

An interactive Buncee is helpful here, keeping the students focused while also allowing them to show that they have absorbed the safety lessons they've been taught.

Buncee has an example of just this here.

Create a choice board with Buncee

Buncee

(Image credit: Buncee)

Use Buncee to create a choice board for anything. In this example it's code, but since a choice board is essentially a selection of links, you can be creative. Here there are four sections, each with headings and a description with a link overlaid in the top right hand corner.

This can take the student off to a webpage, to carry out a coding exercise. You can share lots of different resources from around the web, while using the Buncee as a gateway to guide the students. 

A follow-up quiz Buncee that tests their learning after visiting the links is a great way to ensure students focus and learn.

Create assessments using Buncee

Buncee

(Image credit: Buncee)

The Buncee Ideas Lab offers quite a few examples of quiz and assessment options. The above one is a great way to get started, with lots of different Buncees that you can clip and stitch into your own quiz. 

This can be used in any area for any grade to get students engaging digitally, and also for showing that they've done the research part of the work. It also makes for a useful way to keep track of student progress and to see how well they work with the digital tool, or not, so you can adapt your style to suit.