10 Steps to an Effective Professional Development Plan - Tech Learning

10 Steps to an Effective Professional Development Plan

Tip: Develop a professional development subcommittee as part of the school technology committee. Demonstrate some examples of how technology can be used in the classroom. Use multiple needs assessment instruments that follow the NETS Teacher Technology Standards (ISTE http://cnets.iste.org) and that identify
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Tip:

  1. Develop a professional development subcommittee as part of the school technology committee.
  2. Demonstrate some examples of how technology can be used in the classroom.
  3. Use multiple needs assessment instruments that follow the NETS Teacher Technology Standards (ISTE http://cnets.iste.org) and that identify comfort level and attitude about technology, basic technology use, and level of integration.
  4. Design individual learning plans (ILP) compiled from the data collected from each teacher.
  5. Identify the leaders at your site who can provide expertise.
  6. Create a list of on-site learning opportunities with goals, objectives and outcomes.
  7. Share a list of off-site and online learning opportunities.
  8. Build in time for grade-level or department meetings to plan and correlate standards with technology, develop activities, projects and lessons that include technology, classroom management strategies, and assessment instruments.
  9. At staff meetings, share successes as well as expectations not met.
  10. Continue with ongoing planning and re-evaluating where you are and where you want to be.

For more information, go to http://www.my-ecoach.com/resources/tensteps.html

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

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