Collaboration Tools help Teachers and Students Learn - Tech Learning

Collaboration Tools help Teachers and Students Learn

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Online collaboration tools like blogs, wikis, Linkedin®, Twitter™, and Facebook® open doors for us to interact and be more social in the ways we use the Internet. Educators in all areas can benefit by infusing some or all of these technologies in their learning environments. The new Collaborating with a Global Community Spotlight helps educators identify how teachers and students can connect themselves to a global community, reflect on the best global project(s) to introduce into the classroom and plan the necessary steps for implementing a project.

Atomic Learning’s Spotlights provide a structured training path around important topics related to 21st Century Skills and Technology Integration. The path allows teachers to quickly:

  • build their understanding of a topic
  • practice the topic through projects
  • reflect on how to apply the concepts in their classroom to get all students actively engaged in learning.

See all Spotlight topics available under Training Spotlight here.

P.D. Tips courtesy of Atomic Learning 

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