Digital Storytelling and Standards-based Education

Tip: A successful professional development experience will help participants relate the process of digital storytelling to standards-based education. Begin this process near the end of the workshop or staff development event by having participants reflect on what they have learned. Extend the reflection by
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A successful professional development experience will help participants relate the process of digital storytelling to standards-based education. Begin this process near the end of the workshop or staff development event by having participants reflect on what they have learned. Extend the reflection by debriefing with all participants to develop a list of skills acquired.

Continue this process by linking what they have learned as participants with NETS for Students and with 21st Century Skills. It is also appropriate to link this discussion to local standards. Drawing correlation between digital storytelling and standards is critical in our current educational climate and will provide a realistic justification for including a time-intensive instructional process in an already crowded school curriculum.

Submitted by:David S. Jakes
Instructional Technology Coordinator
Community High School District 99
Downers Grove, IL

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