District website blocking policies - Tech Learning

District website blocking policies

Question: Doug Johnson, an IT Guy reader, send in the following tip regarding district website blocking policies. The IT Guy says: Districts need to have a process in place for determining which Websites are blocked and which are not, just as they now have a process in place for dealing with materials
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Question: Doug Johnson, an IT Guy reader, send in the following tip regarding district website blocking policies.

The IT Guy says:
Districts need to have a process in place for determining which Websites are blocked and which are not, just as they now have a process in place for dealing with materials challenges.
Without a process in place, the district will not be able to justify its choices of what is blocked and what is not. Today the request might be to block MySpace; tomorrow the request might be to block sites on evolution, homosexuality, the Republican Party, and on it goes...
For a more complete examination of this issue, take a look at this column from the May, 2005 issue of Leading and Learning with Technology, entitled "Maintaining Intellectual Freedom in a Filtered World."

Doug is Director of Media and Technology for a school district and maintains the excellent “Blue Skunk Blog.”

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