Emerging Technology: Podcasting In the Classroom

My staff has agreed to use their classroom Weblogs to post notes and assignments for students who are absent. The concept is popular with students and parents. However, it’s taking much more time than originally anticipated because the teachers are finding that the notes must be extensive to be of any help. Is
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My staff has agreed to use their classroom Weblogs to post notes and assignments for students who are absent. The concept is popular with students and parents. However, it’s taking much more time than originally anticipated because the teachers are finding that the notes must be extensive to be of any help. Is there another approach we can take?

An emerging form of online communication may prove to be helpful in time; not just for students who missed class, but also for classes that include auditory materials such as foreign language or music courses. Called podcasting, this technology allows users to make audio recordings, save them as MP3 files, and then post links to the files on the Web. This means that teachers can record lectures and discussions in real time. To listen to a podcast, you need a computer or a handheld device such as Apple’s iPod.

A certain amount of editing may be needed, based upon background noise or interruptions, and this could be a stumbling block for those who do not have these skills. So it might be best to pilot podcasting with one or two highly motivated teachers at first.

Submitted by: Susan Brooks-Young

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