How to sell in-class gaming

Drawn from the recent report Guidelines for K–12 Education released by the SIIA. For the full document, go to www.siia.net education. Give teachers a metaphor that connects EduGames to something familiar. In schools, EduGames are most closely related to lab
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Drawn from the recent report Guidelines for K–12 Education released by the SIIA. For the full document, go to www.siia.net/education.

-Give teachers a metaphor that connects EduGames to something familiar.

-In schools, EduGames are most closely related to lab work—hands-on time for students to explore and use what they have learned elsewhere.

-EduGames need to contain guidelines for classroom management.

-Most teachers will need to understand how classroom management and professional development will be addressed before they will agree to use EduGames.

-Teachers need to understand their role as content-area experts.

One of the biggest fears teachers have about using EduGames is that there is not a role for them, which may lead to a loss of control in the classroom. Explaining the role of the teacher can alleviate their reluctance to try games.

-Teachers need research and peer references.

-A well-researched reference base is essential; it cannot be skimped on. Educators assume that references are there for more traditional materials, but newer, riskier products are naturally held to a higher standard.

-EduGames need proof of efficacy.

-One rarely hears school boards demanding to know how much textbooks are being used and what results are being attained. Education technology is held to a much higher standard—and particularly so cutting-edge technology.

-EduGames must be aligned to standards.

-Games present some challenges in this area because of the naturally multidisciplinary nature of gaming, and because many of the skills they [students] develop are not part of the core curriculum (but should be!).

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How to sell in-class gaming

Drawn from the recent report Guidelines for K–12 Education released by the SIIA. For the full document, go to www.siia.net education. Give teachers a metaphor that connects EduGames to something familiar. In schools, EduGames are most closely related to lab

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