Looking for a Specific Person? Place? Image? Movie? - Tech Learning

Looking for a Specific Person? Place? Image? Movie?

Tip: Students compiling projects will adore this search tool, sponsored by Amazon.com. Go to A9. On the homepage is a search box and a series of checkboxes. “Web” and “Images” are checked by default, but may be unchecked. In addition, users may check:
Author:
Publish date:

Tip:

  • Students compiling projects will adore this search tool, sponsored by Amazon.com.
  • Go to A9. On the homepage is a search box and a series of checkboxes. “Web” and “Images” are checked by default, but may be unchecked. In addition, users may check: “People,” “Books,” “Reference,” “Wikipedia,” “Blog Search,” and even select more from the “More Choices” pull-down menu.
  • Check (uncheck) whichever boxes you deem appropriate. Then type your search string into the search box and click “go.”
  • Up will pop an amazing collection of relevant links, and, if you checked “Images,” clickable thumbnails. For example, searching for “Judge Crater” (the New York State Supreme Court Judge who disappeared in 1930) brings up a list of books, a list of relevant links, a miniature biography, and tons more. Indeed, some students might use just this page to obtain lots of useable material! Also, if a student is vacillating about her/his prospective topic, the initial page will convince her/him to either continue or to select a new topic.
  • Another learning experience for students is to realize that search engines are neither human nor error-free, as the link to a mystery novel entitled “Crater County” would demonstrate. But, again, this can be a ‘teachable moment’for our digital generation, proving that computers are not infallible. It could also give rise to a lesson on proper searching techniques.
  • Warning: A9, another search tool which is a lot more interesting than Google, can become addictive. You might find yourself adding or removing parameters and searching more and more deeply for relevant information. But it can be a lot of fun!

Next Tip: Live on the Fly

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