Measuring the Impact of Technology Use: Where to Start?

The evaluation component of our technology plan is getting much closer scrutiny than in the past. We need to figure out how to improve this part of the plan, but we don’t know where to begin! A well-designed evaluation begins with a series of guiding or key questions that tie directly back to your plan goals.
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The evaluation component of our technology plan is getting much closer scrutiny than in the past. We need to figure out how to improve this part of the plan, but we don’t know where to begin!

A well-designed evaluation begins with a series of guiding or key questions that tie directly back to your plan goals. These questions help you focus on what’s important and how success will be measured. For example, if you have goals related to technology’s impact on students, you need to ask questions about academic achievement, student engagement, etc. Once the questions are established, you can decide on success indicators, sources for information, and benchmarks.

The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) recently released the Profiling Educational Technology Integration (PETI) toolkit. This free resource is available at Profiling Educational Technology Integration (http://setda-peti.org/) and includes a framework with key questions aligned to Title II, Part D of No Child Left Behind. You and your committee can use these key questions as a model.

Submitted by: Susan Brooks-Young

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