Not Just Fun and Games - Tech Learning

Not Just Fun and Games

This month we explore a trend that suddenly seems to be the subject of articles, books, Webcasts, blogs, and conferences everywhere you look. Yes, that would be the g word: games. Why the focus on games? To quote "Video Games and the Future of Learning," one source for this month's cover feature ("Game Plan"), "Games
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

This month we explore a trend that suddenly seems to be the subject of articles, books, Webcasts, blogs, and conferences everywhere you look. Yes, that would be the g word: games.

Why the focus on games? To quote "Video Games and the Future of Learning," one source for this month's cover feature ("Game Plan"), "Games encourage exploration, personalized meaning-making, individual expression, and playful experimentation with social boundaries—all of which cut against the grain of the social mores valued in school."

Read "Game Plan" to find out what the latest research is saying and what experts flag as the primary issues and challenges to integrating this new instructional genre into schools. Stay tuned for part two of the series in November, in which we'll examine what students learn when they create their own games.

Continuing in the game vein, Managing Editor Mark Smith evaluates the new Muzzy Lane simulation, Making History: The Calm and the Storm, in our Reviews department. Games will also be among the hot topics addressed at our New York Tech Forum conference on Oct. 19.

This month T&L also covers what Thomas Friedman (The World is Flat) and others are calling "self-organizing collaborative communities"—see Will Richardson's Emerging Tech column on blogs.

Finally, the staff of T& L extends its deepest sympathies to the victims of Hurricane Katrina. Those of us more fortunate can help out by visiting www.redcross.org. The Department of Education has also established Hurricane Help for Schools at www.ed.gov/news/hurricane/index.html. A special section of www.techlearning.com will also be dedicated to education-related resources and opportunities for those affected.

Featured

Related

Not just child's play

Invention at Play starts with the premise that childhood play and toys and games helped inventors invent. Students are able to go into the invention playhouse and do interactive puzzles dealing with problem solving, exploration and other skills. Through stories

Image placeholder title

It’s Not Just a Tool

The following is an adaptation from a blog post by T&L advisor Dean Shareski and a selection of responses from readers.

Playground Fun

Playground Fun How quintessentially British — a site that explains the rules for playground games. Even better, the rules were written by actual British schoolchildren. Topics covered include "Chasing," "Catching each other," "Searching games," "Ball games," "Circle or ring games,"

It's Not Just a Game—It's Skills for Life

-->from Educators' eZineHow would you answer this question?Q: Your students are most likely to be learning the real-world skills that employers demand when they are:a) In the classroom, following the lessons in the textbook.b) At home, completing

Kids’ Fun Food Games

Use this set of interactive games to help increase your knowledge of healthy snacks, exercise and diet, and how to read food labels.

Fun and Games Archive

Fun and Games Archive Sponsored by Imaginon, a child-centered activity place created by North Carolina's Charlotte and Mecklenburg County Public Library, this is a huge pot-pourri of interactive activities related to children's literature and more. It is a garden of earthly delights, but one that

Image placeholder title

Mobile Not Just for BYOT

According to a new survey conducted byMDR’s EdNET Insight service on behalf ofMimio, school administrators, technologydirectors, and coordinators responded thatmobile learning goes beyond 1:1 and BYODprograms. Survey highlights include:

Fun Games About Bones

Find a menu of interactive games that strengthen knowledge of the fundamentals of bone biology and health. From the Children's Museum of Indianapolis. courtesy of netTrekker