The Realities of BYOD - Tech Learning

The Realities of BYOD

Although the use of mobiletechnology in classrooms ismeant to improve studentlearning through access tothe Internet, surveys showthat low-income studentsare missing out.
Author:
Publish date:

Although the use of mobile technology in classrooms is meant to improve student learning through access to the Internet, surveys show that low-income students are missing out.

Image placeholder title

A 2013 Pew study noted that a mere third of teachers (35%) at the lowest income schools allow their students to look up information on their devices, versus over half of teachers (52%) at wealthier schools. Highlighting that this is part of a wider trend, the survey also showed that most teachers (70%) in high-income areas say their schools provide adequate resources and support to integrate technology into the classroom, compared to only half of the teachers in low-income areas.

In low-income areas, teachers are faced with a “persistent student culture of disengagement.” Students often have learning gaps that leave them with little interest in grade-level materials, or worse, little interest in attending school at all.

However, the Pew survey results might be skewed due to perception. Perhaps students in wealthier schools just switch back to the task at hand when a teacher walks by, and the teacher trusts that the student has been truly engaged with the schoolwork.

Although the results of the survey are open to interpretation, one thing is clear: the culture of low achievement that often starts when students are young is difficult to abandon as those students move through high school. As administrators focus on graduation rates, they could trace the trends (and possibly change the outcomes) by honing in on effective and engaging instruction in earlier education.

Read more at www.techlearning.com/september14

Featured

Related

Image placeholder title

The Realities of 1:1

Another day, and another district is going 1:1. That’s the good news. T&L wanted to see ifthere were any steps to take—or to avoid—to ease implementation and everything thereafter.

Image placeholder title

BYOD Strategies

Proponents of “bring your own device” (BYOD) programs like them for a lot of reasons: budgets keep dwindling, students already bring devices to school, and technology isn’t getting cheaper.

Image placeholder title

SCHOOLCIO : BYOD Strategies

Proponents of “bring your own device” (BYOD) programs like them for a lot of reasons: budgets keep dwindling, students already bring devices to school, and technology isn’t getting cheaper.

Image placeholder title

BYOD and Security

Last month we wrote about the evolution of one-to-one computing and how districts are allowing students to “bring your own device” (BYOD) to school.

Image placeholder title

Teachers Want to Make Virtual Reality a Reality

While only two percent of teachers have used VR in the classroom, over 60 percent are interested in making it part of the learning experience, according to research released at ISTE 2016 by Samsung Electronics America, Inc. and GfK.

Image placeholder title

A Scary Reality

Ask a parent, “What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the term Internet safety?”

Image placeholder title

BYOD —One Year Later

SchoolCIO checked in with some of the schools and districts we know who’ve allowed students and teachers to bring in their own devices.