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T&L News(47) - Tech Learning

T&L News(47)

Online High School for the Gifted Stanford University is opening the country's first online high school for gifted students, enabling students to take really challenging coursework and earn a high school diploma. Whiteboards Rule. Interactive whiteboards are growing in popularity, with teachers and administrators
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  • Online High School for the Gifted
    Stanford University is opening the country's first online high school for gifted students, enabling students to take really challenging coursework and earn a high school diploma.
  • Whiteboards Rule.
    Interactive whiteboards are growing in popularity, with teachers and administrators citing their appeal to today's media savvy students.
  • New High Tech High School Being Planned
    When Tech Valley High School opens in Fall 2007, it will offer students in New York's Capital Region a project-based curriculum focused on math, science and technology.
  • Professional Development for Online International Collaboration
    The New Jersey Department of Education has partnered with the International Education and Resource Network (iEARN-USA) to provide professional development to teachers on how to integrate online project work with schools worldwide into their classrooms.
  • Emerging Technologies or Hype?
    Gartner Inc.'s 2006 Emerging Technologies Hype Cycle report assesses the maturity, impact and adoption speed of 36 key technologies and trends during the next ten years.

Online High School for the Gifted

Stanford University is opening the country's first online high school for gifted students. The University has offered online courses for a number of years through its Education Program for Gifted Youth (EPGY) program. Now students will be able to go beyond individual challenging courses to earning their high school diploma. The program is designed to serve the needs of the top tier of academically gifted students. The school will start small, serving 30 sophomores, juniors and seniors this school year, eventually growing to 300 students. Students will be able to go well beyond the typical AP course, studying multivariable calculus, linear algebra and differential equations, courses on a par with those talented first-year Stanford students take. School administrators say they plan to push their students to live up to their full potential, but that's not likely to bother students like 14-year old Matthew Bunday, who scored a perfect SAT math score at age 11. Though able to enroll in college, that was not a choice his parents wanted to exercise. The Stanford online high school will enable students to make progress and interact with a community of gifted students from around the world. The school will offer two types of courses. One is a self-directed option in which students will learn from a CD-ROM and contact instructors online with questions. The other is a seminar-style course where students and teachers will use audio feeds to discuss and study online classroom materials together. The online opportunity won't come cheaply; annual tuition for a full-time student is $12,000. Stanford plans to offer financial aid. Stanford will also recommend that students visit the campus during the summer to meet instructors and take classes impossible to teach online, such as labs.

Source:San Francisco Chronicle

Whiteboards Rule

Interactive whiteboards are growing in popularity, with teachers and administrators citing their appeal to today's media savvy students. The interactive whiteboard, used in conjunction with a computer and projector, allows students to actively participate in a lesson. It also makes it easier for teachers to present information to the whole class and keep everyone actively engaged. More than 20 schools in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky area have added interactive whiteboards for the new school year. The Cincinnati Public School system is installing whiteboards and technology that allows teachers to project computer screens onto large monitors, whiteboards or drop-down screens in all its new schools. The whiteboards help maximize the impact of computer technology, letting students control programs with a touch and capturing notes from lectures and class presentations. Teachers can easily share Internet pages and project streaming video for the entire class rather than having students gather around two or three shared classroom computers. Dry-erase whiteboards first made their way into classrooms in the mid-1980s, touted as a cleaner, dust free replacement for traditional chalkboards. The interactive variety arrived some 15 years later and despite the high cost, is making steady inroads. While a dry-erase whiteboard may cost $70 to $400 per panel, depending on materials and size, interactive whiteboards cost $1,000 to $1,500 each. That means that, for now, interactive whiteboards are often a shared resource, used by a number of classrooms on a rotating basis.

Source:The Cincinnati Enquirer

New High Tech High School Being Planned

When New York's Tech Valley High School opens in Fall 2007, it will be the first school in the Northeast based on the model of Napa's New Technology High School—a school focused on math, science and technology. The school's curriculum will not only meet New York's state standards and the Regents requirements, but will go much further, exposing students to high-tech subjects such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, information technology, energy technology and advanced materials. Lectures will be replaced with project-based teamwork, using the latest technology. Internships and close ties to the region's business community will be a central feature of the school's model of education. The Business Alliance for Tech Valley High, a group of business, education and government leaders, is helping to shape and support the school. Initial funding of $1.2 million is coming from start-up and development money from the state and the New Technology Foundation, a California-based educational nonprofit. The school will be run by Questar III, the regional BOCES serving school districts in Rensselaer, Columbia and Greene counties, along with Capital Region BOCES, which serves Albany, Schenectady, Schoharie and southern Saratoga counties. Students will be drawn from the 48 school districts that Questar III and Capital Region BOCES serve. During its first two years, Tech Valley High will operate in some 7,500 square feet of donated space in the headquarters building of InfoMap, one of the region's high tech companies. Plans call for moving to East Greenbush, in a building of its own but preferably on a business park campus to allow students to continue to interact with high tech businesses. Tech Valley High School's annual budget is expected to be between $4 million and $5 million once it is fully operational, with 400 students in grades 9 through 12.

Source:The Times Union

Professional Development for Online International Collaboration

The New Jersey Department of Education has partnered with the International Education and Resource Network (iEARN-USA), to support a new K-12 international education project. IEARN will provide professional development to teachers on how to integrate online project work into their classrooms with schools worldwide. iEARN's workshops will build the skills needed to engage in collaborative activities, such as peer review, team building, joining regional and international learning communities, and developing project-based curricula that integrate national educational standards. The goal is to get teachers to the point where they are able to assist their classes to join Internet-based collaborative learning projects. The partnership project will culminate with a New Jersey International Education Technology Showcase in late spring 2007 where teachers will have the opportunity to share online international projects they have designed during the school year. New Jersey will publish a new "Guide for Incorporating International Knowledge and Skills into New Jersey's Core Curriculum" in January 2007. The guide is a curriculum planning tool for K-12 teachers and school districts to further the state's vision for international education: to help students understand and act on global issues by integrating international perspectives into the curriculum. Teachers are increasingly expressing interest in using online technology to infuse a global perspective into their classrooms.

Source:New Jersey Department of Education

Emerging Technologies or Hype?

Gartner Inc., a leader in technology-related research and advice, released its 2006 Emerging Technologies Hype Cycle report., which assesses the maturity, impact and adoption speed of 36 key technologies and trends during the next ten years. The report identifies technologies that are worth adopting early because of their potentially high business impact. This year's report highlights three major themes: Web 2.0, Real World Web and Applications Architecture. In the Web 2.0 arena, social-network analysis and Ajax were rated as "high impact" and capable of reaching maturity in less than two years. SNA is the use of information and knowledge from many people and their personal networks. It involves collecting massive amounts of data from multiple sources, analyzing the data to identify relationships and mining it for new information. Businesses could use this data to identify target markets, create project teams and discover unvoiced conclusions. Ajax is a collection of techniques that Web developers use to deliver an enhanced, more-responsive user experience in the confines of a modern browser. In the Real World Web arena, Gartner predicts that location-aware technologies should hit maturity in less than two years. Location-aware technology is the use of GPS (global positioning system), assisted GPS and other technologies in the cellular network and handset to locate a mobile user. One of the features highlighted in the 2006 Hype Cycle is the growing consumerisation of IT. Many of the Web 2.0 phenomenon have already reshaped the Web in the consumer world, leaving the corporate world to establish how to incorporate consumer technologies in a secure and effective manner for employee productivity, and also how to transform them into business value for the enterprise.

Source:Information Week

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