Win98 Won't Start Up - Tech Learning

Win98 Won't Start Up

Question: When I start up my classroom computer, it reaches the initial Windows 98 screen and then goes to a Windows Registry Checker (blue screen) stating it is backing up system files. It never gets off of that screen; I have to reboot. I tried scandisk after pressing CTRL on boot-up, but that doesn't correct
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

Question: When I start up my classroom computer, it reaches the initial Windows 98 screen and then goes to a Windows Registry Checker (blue screen) stating it is backing up system files. It never gets off of that screen; I have to reboot. I tried scandisk after pressing CTRL on boot-up, but that doesn't correct it.

The IT Guy says:
The Windows Registry Checker is set up to scan your system for invalid registry settings, and if it finds problems, it will normally restore registry settings to previously saved backup settings that were functional. Since your computer cannot boot past this process, you may have corrupted registry settings and a bad backup version, which the computer cannot restore. By default, Windows 98 will save registry settings from the past 5 days the computer was restarted, so most likely you do have a saved set registry settings you can restore that will work.

If you are in a lab setting, the easiest way to deal with problems like this is often to use imaging software like Symantec Ghost and re-image the hard drive from the server or CD-ROM. (http://enterprisesecurity.symantec.com/products/products.cfm?ProductID=3&EID=0) Re-imaging means replacing all the data on your hard drive with a saved image from a "pristine" / fully functional computer usually identical in its hardware components. For minor problems this may seem like overkill, but if you are short on time and need that computer to be functional again with a minimum of effort it may be the way to go.

If the computer is not in a lab and/or imaging software is not available, you may be able to either restore the registry settings to their default values or else reinstall the operating system. Most likely you can restore the registry settings.

To do this, boot into DOS (the command prompt.) At startup after rebooting, hold down the control key when the startup BIOS information for your computer disappears. When a menu of choices appears, press the spacebar to provide additional time to make your selection. Use the arrow keys or press the appropriate number to select a startup to the command prompt only.

After starting up to the command line, type SCANREG/RESTORE. You should see a menu of choices for the backup versions of the registry (CABs). Select the one you want to restore using the arrow keys, then select EXIT and restart your computer.

Microsoft has an article describing how you can customize the Registry Checker Tool settings for Windows98 on http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;183603. You can set the computer to backup more copies of the registry and also create the backups more frequently. You can also manually create backups. It is a good idea to create a backup before installing new software, just in case the software installs something that causes a conflict. In that case, you can use the steps above to restore your registry settings to the previously functional settings.

Next Tip: Deep Freeze on Windows 2000/XP?

Featured

Related

iBook Won't Start Up

Question: My two-year-old iBook laptop won’t start up, even when I have it plugged into AC power. Help! The IT Guy says: Sometimes if you have fully discharged the battery in an iBook and the computer has gone to sleep, it may not start up even when it is plugged into power. Try unplugging the iBook from power

Auto-start Entourage

Question: How can I configure my new Macintosh G5 to automatically start Entourage when the computer boots up, so my email will always get checked automatically. The IT Guy says: In Macintosh OS X, you can configure an application to automatically open at startup: From the Apple menu in the upper left corner

Backing Up

Listen to the podcast Question: If I back up to CDs or DVDs, are my files safe? The IT Guy says: CDs and DVDs are a really convenient and inexpensive way to store data. CDs can be purchased in bulk for pennies per disk, and even DVDs now cost less than fifty cents apiece. You can store thousands of

Backing Up Files

Question: What's good back up software to save all Data for Quicken, Outlook and other data? The IT Guy says: Backing up your computer files generally requires two things: backup media and backup software. If you are on a network at school, have a network folder and sufficient storage space, one of the best ways

Backing Up Your Hard Drive

Subscribe to TechTips RSS Feed Listen to this podcast If you have ever reformatted a computer, reloaded it with software by loading the programs one by one, you know it can be a time-consuming process. As a matter of fact, I recall spending many an hour loading software with a book in hand (pleasure reading, not

Setting up your PDAs

Tip: What if you or your teachers are new to Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs)? There are different types of Personal Digital Assistants from which to choose, including those on smart phones. PalmOS® and Windows Mobile™ Pocket PC are the main two operating systems that are used in schools and come

Maximize Computer Up Time

Question: How can we maximize lab computer up time and minimize the time required to fix problems by technical support? The IT Guy says: Like death and taxes, software and hardware problems with computer lab equipment are inevitable. Hours of time can be wasted on a regular basis fixing problems that crop up from

Stop Spam and Pop-ups

Question: Is there a free program to stop spam &/or pop-ups? The IT Guy says: Yes, a variety of solutions for stopping spam and blocking pop-ups are available. One of the easiest ways to block pop-ups is to use a web browser that allows popup blocking as a preference setting. The free Opera web browser works on

Setting Up a Web Server

Listen to this podcast One classroom teacher at the TCEA State Conference (http://www.tcea.org/) said, "I want to set up my own Web server in my classroom because I can't get space on the District server. Am I able to do that?" The answer is, "Of course!" Then, I reminded the person that they