PxPixel
STUDENTS NEED CODING IN SCHOOLS—AND MORE—TO FILL STEM JOBS OF FUTURE - Tech Learning

STUDENTS NEED CODING IN SCHOOLS—AND MORE—TO FILL STEM JOBS OF FUTURE

There’s no question that expanding our K–12 students’ proficiency in STEM is critical to preparing them for careers in fast-growing sectors of our economy.
Author:
Publish date:

There’s no question that expanding our K–12 students’ proficiency in STEM is critical to preparing them for careers in fast-growing sectors of our economy. But top candidates for the jobs of the future will require much more. As my colleagues and I applaud the administration’s focus on boosting STEM education—and private-sector promises to help pay the bill—we urge that these efforts reach far beyond teaching coding in schools.

ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

false

false

Today’s young people must receive a full complement of educational experiences that enable them to develop the wide range of skills they will need to adapt to the jobs of tomorrow and succeed in the STEM economy.

The priority list is long, especially for the least-served students, who may not have Internet access in school, let alone a single computer science course. But based on Jobs for the Future’s 35 years working to increase economic opportunity for lower-income youth and adults, I’d like to highlight three essentials for schools of all backgrounds:

1. Incorporate key employability skills into learning, such as communication, critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork.
2. Provide real-world work experience, such as internships and other forms of work-based learning. Students learn countless intellectual, personal, and social skills when on the job with experienced workers.
3. Develop youth-friendly career navigation resources. Learning about career options and making smart choices to reach one’s goals can be daunting for most people.

Creating better education and training pathways to the jobs of the future is a national imperative. We encourage the administration to think boldly and expansively about the full range of educational experiences our students need to help build a vigorous American economy—and thrive in it.

Maria Flynn is president & CEO of Jobs for the Future.

Featured

Related

2017 Reading Discovery Program Highlights Personal Diplomacy at the Bush Presidential Library promo image

SIEMENS FOUNDATION AND DISCOVERY EDUCATION ANNOUNCE NEW ‘SIEMENS STEM DAY’ ONLINE PROGRAM TO SPARK STUDENTS’ INTEREST IN REAL-WORLD APPLICATIONS OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH

Today, the Siemens Foundation and Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms, launched  Siemens STEM Day ― a refreshed and expanded version of the beloved Siemens Science Day website that includes a new K-12 online STEM experience. In addition to more than 130 elementary and middle school activities, the Siemens STEM Day site now offers high school resources designed to support STEM curriculum and instruction with digital content. To celebrate the initiative’s launch, Siemens STEM Day is also hosting The Possibility Grant Sweepstakes, which offers schools the chance to win up to $10,000 to go toward STEM education. 

TIGER WOODS FOUNDATION AND DISCOVERY EDUCATION LAUNCH DIGITAL PROGRAMS IN COLLEGE PREP AND STEM CAREERS promo image

TIGER WOODS FOUNDATION AND DISCOVERY EDUCATION LAUNCH DIGITAL PROGRAMS IN COLLEGE PREP AND STEM CAREERS

If students had the most innovative tools to help them see the future, what would they see? Today, the Tiger Woods Foundation (TWF), TGR's philanthropic arm, joined with Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms, to launch “TGR EDU: Explore,” an initiative for middle and high school students that helps navigate the college exploration process and introduces them to high-quality STEM-focused career paths for today's jobs, and the ones that don't exist yet.

Utah’s Wasatch County Schools Launches New Partnership with Discovery Education to Accelerate Digital Conversion Districtwide promo image

United States Tennis Association and Discovery Education To Host Exclusive US Open “Careers Beyond The Court” STEM Virtual Field Trip To Inspire Students’ Pursuit Of Careers In Sports

The United States Tennis Association (USTA), the national governing body for the sport of tennis, and Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms, have teamed up to host the first ever Careers Beyond the Court Virtual Field Trip to inspire students to explore exciting career paths in the tennis industry. The event, announced today, will premiere on Thursday, September 14, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. ET. Careers Beyond the Court will take students to the new USTA National Campus in Orlando, Florida and the 2017 US Open, hosted at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York, to expose youth to experiences motivated by their passions and talents. As part of the Virtual Field Trip, special guest host James Blake, USTA Foundation Chairman and former world #4 tennis pro, along with US Open executives, will share experiences and insider knowledge of the diverse and dynamic career paths available in the sports industry. 

Utah’s Wasatch County Schools Launches New Partnership with Discovery Education to Accelerate Digital Conversion Districtwide promo image

DISCOVERY EDUCATION AND ARCONIC FOUNDATION HOST FIRST “MANUFACTURE YOUR FUTURE” VIRTUAL DAY OF LEARNING TO INSPIRE FUTURE ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, TECHNOLOGISTS

In celebration of National Manufacturing Day, Arconic Foundation, the independently endowed philanthropic arm of Arconic, and Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms, today announced the Manufacture Your Future Day of Learning – a virtual experience developed to inspire students to explore innovative opportunities in modern manufacturing. 

Image placeholder title

Learning to Code or Coding to Learn

Michael Trucano explores the growing international movement to promote coding (i.e. writing a set of step-by-step directions that instruct computers to do something) and to help students develop related skills.