The U.S. Constitution: Continuity and Change in Governing of the United States - Tech Learning

The U.S. Constitution: Continuity and Change in Governing of the United States

Tomorrow is Constitution and Citizenship Day, when there is a federal observance of the adoption of the Constitution in 1787.
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Tomorrow is Constitution and Citizenship Day, when there is a federal observance of the adoption of the Constitution in 1787. This lesson plan from the Library of Congress is a two-week lesson plan, but there are parts that can be pulled out to use for just one day. Use primary sources referenced in the lesson plan to examine the Constitution and Bill of Rights, understand the important issues facing the Continental Congress as it discussed the content of the Constitution, and determine how contemporary issues are dealt with by Congress.

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