LOUISIANA STUDENTS ACHIEVE READING LEVEL GAIN OF ONE YEAR IN ONE SEMESTER USING NEUROSCIENCE-BASED SOFTWARE - Tech Learning

LOUISIANA STUDENTS ACHIEVE READING LEVEL GAIN OF ONE YEAR IN ONE SEMESTER USING NEUROSCIENCE-BASED SOFTWARE

Across Louisiana, nearly 20 percent of school districts and several private schools have implemented the neuroscience-based Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant programs. In Lafayette Parish, students using the programs showed a one-year improvement in their reading skills during the four months between assessments. 
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Oakland, Calif. — April 11, 2016 — Louisiana is raising academic standards to ensure each and every student graduates on time, with the knowledge and skills to succeed in college and careers. To help students build the foundational reading, language and cognitive skills they need to succeed in the classroom and beyond, a growing number of Louisiana school districts are implementing the Fast ForWord® and Reading Assistant™ programs from Scientific Learning Corp. (OTC PINK:SCIL).

Across Louisiana, nearly 20 percent of school districts and several private schools have implemented the neuroscience-based online language and reading interventions. Among the most recent Louisiana districts to launch or expand their implementations are Lafayette Parish, Evangeline Parish, and Rapides Parish school systems.

In Lafayette Parish, when Dr. Donald W. Aguillard began his tenure as superintendent of schools in May 2015, he discovered that the district held licenses for the Fast ForWord program but wasn’t using them. He immediately reactivated the Fast ForWord program in 17 schools.

In fall 2015, 1,770 students used at least one Fast ForWord product, and took a follow-up Reading Progress Indicator (RPI) assessment. On average, the students showed a one-year improvement in their reading skills during the four months between assessments.

Since then, Lafayette Parish has expanded the Fast ForWord program to four additional schools and has begun piloting the Reading Assistant program.

“One of my unwavering core beliefs is that school improvement is achievable through deliberate action. In my previous district, we saw phenomenal results with the Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant programs, and we’re excited about the results we’re seeing in Lafayette Parish,” said Aguillard. “We now have nearly 4,400 students using Fast ForWord, and the pre- and-post test data show that these students are accelerating their language and reading proficiency.”

For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com.

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