3 Easy Web Accessibility Guidelines - Tech Learning

3 Easy Web Accessibility Guidelines

If you're an innovative educator, chances are you publish work on the web.
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If you're an innovative educator, chances are you publish work on the web. If you publish work on the web, chances are you want others to read that work. If you want others to read that work, then you need to make it accessible. While that "sounds" good, it may "seem" hard. There are sites you can refer to like Web Aim and you can look at these 5 infographics for details. If you want to know three easy guidelines to always keep in mind, a colleague of mine, shared the following with me and I'm sharing with the innovative educators who read this blog.

Three easy guidelines for web accessibility:

  1. Text: For text, stick to contrast that is close to that of black on white and fonts that are at least 12 point. (Headlines can be a little less crisp).
  2. Images: Don’t put text in images (.jpegs, .bmps, video) that isn’t on the page itself. It can’t be machine translated or read by devices used by the visually impaired.
  3. Colors: A significant portion of the population is red/green colorblind to some degree—so using red and green to “code” meaning (stop and go, good and bad) will not work for those people.
  • I generally use the blog's default here, which I believe takes this into consideration.
  • This is a mistake I make often. I will go back through my recent posts and update to meet this guideline.
  • Interesting. Something I likely have done, but will stop doing in future posts.

If you prefer infographics, here is one from http://WebAim.org If you prefer infographics, here is one from http://WebAim.org

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What do you think? Are these guidelines you generally follow? Any surprises?

Lisa Nielsen writes for and speaks to audiences across the globe about learning innovatively and is frequently covered by local and national media for her views on “Passion (not data) Driven Learning,” "Thinking Outside the Ban" to harness the power of technology for learning, and using the power of social media to provide a voice to educators and students. Ms. Nielsen has worked for more than a decade in various capacities to support learning in real and innovative ways that will prepare students for success. In addition to her award-winning blog, The Innovative Educator, Ms. Nielsen’s writing is featured in places such as Huffington Post, Tech & Learning, ISTE Connects, ASCD Wholechild, MindShift, Leading & Learning, The Unplugged Mom, and is the author the book Teaching Generation Text.

Disclaimer: The information shared here is strictly that of the author and does not reflect the opinions or endorsement of her employer.

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